LEGISLATIVE BILL SUMMARIES

Florida League of Cities

The 2022 regular Legislative Session commences on January 11 and will adjourn on March 11. Below are summaries of all the bills with municipal impact that have been filed to date.


To search bill summaries by a keyword, click Control + F. If you have any questions on a specific bill, please contact the lobbyist tracking the bill. This is indicated by the last name in parenthesis following each bill summary. Links to the House and Senate are located at the bottom of the page.

01 - Spotlight Bills

Additional Homestead Property Tax Exemption (Oppose)

HJR 1 (Tomkow) and SJR 1746 (Brodeur) propose an amendment to the Florida Constitution to authorize the Legislature to create an additional $50,000 homestead exemption on the property's assessed value greater than $100,000 and up to $150,000 to certain public employees. The homestead property must be owned by a classroom teacher, a law enforcement officer, a correctional officer, a firefighter, a child welfare service provider, an active-duty member of the United States Armed Services or a member of the Florida National Guard. (Hughes) ...

HJR 1 (Tomkow) and SJR 1746 (Brodeur) propose an amendment to the Florida Constitution to authorize the Legislature to create an additional $50,000 homestead exemption on the property's assessed value greater than $100,000 and up to $150,000 to certain public employees. The homestead property must be owned by a classroom teacher, a law enforcement officer, a correctional officer, a firefighter, a child welfare service provider, an active-duty member of the United States Armed Services or a member of the Florida National Guard. (Hughes)

Business Damages Against Local Government (Oppose)

SB 620 (Hutson) and CS/HB 569 (McClure) require compensation for business damages caused by local government ordinances or charter provisions. A business that has been engaged in a lawful business in Florida for at least three years may claim business damages from a local government if the government enacts or amends an ordinance or charter provision that will cause a reduction of at least 15% of the business’ profit as applied on a per-location basis of a business operating within the jurisdiction. A local government is not liable for business damages caused by: ordinances required to comply with ...

SB 620 (Hutson) and CS/HB 569 (McClure) require compensation for business damages caused by local government ordinances or charter provisions. A business that has been engaged in a lawful business in Florida for at least three years may claim business damages from a local government if the government enacts or amends an ordinance or charter provision that will cause a reduction of at least 15% of the business’ profit as applied on a per-location basis of a business operating within the jurisdiction. A local government is not liable for business damages caused by: ordinances required to comply with state or federal law; emergency ordinances, declarations or orders adopted pursuant to the state Emergency Management Act; a temporary emergency ordinance which remains in effect for no more than 90 days; ordinances or charter provisions enacted to implement: Part II of Chapter 163; Section 553.73; Section 633.202; a contract or an agreement, including contracts or agreements relating to grants or other financial assistance; debt issuance or refinancing; budgets or budget amendments. The bills specify procedures and methodologies for a business to recover business damages, attorney fees and costs against a local government. The bills’ provisions on attorney fee calculation and award are nearly identical to the business damage procedures set forth in Florida’s eminent domain statute. (O’Hara)

Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance (Support)

HB 9241 (Giallombardo) would provide a nonrecurring sum of $5 million to fund the Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance. This funding would create a program for Cyber Florida to offer threat assessments and grant funding to help local governments update their information technology. (Taggart)  ...

HB 9241 (Giallombardo) would provide a nonrecurring sum of $5 million to fund the Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance. This funding would create a program for Cyber Florida to offer threat assessments and grant funding to help local governments update their information technology. (Taggart)

Cybersecurity (Watch)

SB 1670 (Hutson) requires each local government by January 1, 2024, to adopt cybersecurity standards for all information technology (IT) and operational technology, that comply with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework that is appropriate for the size of the organization. At a minimum, these standards must include routine backups of critical information and multifactor authentication. The bill also requires local governments to:  ...

SB 1670 (Hutson) requires each local government by January 1, 2024, to adopt cybersecurity standards for all information technology (IT) and operational technology, that comply with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework that is appropriate for the size of the organization. At a minimum, these standards must include routine backups of critical information and multifactor authentication. The bill also requires local governments to:  •Conduct vulnerability testing of its IT and operational technology at least every two years •Require all employees with access to a local government network to receive training when they begin employment and at intervals that will be specified by the Florida Digital Service •Require all local government IT professionals and persons with access to highly sensitive information to undergo intensive cybersecurity training •Report all attacks on a computer or network, including ransomware attacks and data breaches, to the State Watch Office within the Division of Emergency Management. "Attacks" is not defined in the bill.  The bill directs the Florida Digital Service and the Florida Cybersecurity Advisory Council to develop the training requirements and conduct the trainings virtually at certain times of the year. Local governments will be required to report all ransomware incidents to the State Watch Office, Florida Digital Service, the Executive Office of the Governor, the Department of Law Enforcement and the local law enforcement agency within 12 hours of discovery. The bill requires local governments to communicate with the Florida Digital Service and the local law enforcement agencies prior to paying a ransom if a ransomware incident occurs. The bill also requires the Florida Digital Service to create a checklist for local governments to utilize while responding to ransomware incidents. Finally, the bill allocates $1 million in recurring funding to Florida Digital Service to disburse funds to local governments for the training required under the bill. (Taggart)

Implementing Bills: Additional Homestead Property Tax Exemption (Oppose)

HB 1563 (Tomkow) and SB 1748 (Brodeur) create an additional homestead exemption for certain public employees if HJR 1, SJR 1746 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. The bills provide for an additional homestead exemption up to $50,000 on the assessed value greater than $100,000 and up to $150,000 for properties owned by a classroom teacher, a law enforcement officer, a correctional officer, a firefighter, a child welfare service provider, an active-duty member of the United States Armed Services or a member of the Florida National Guard. These bills ...

HB 1563 (Tomkow) and SB 1748 (Brodeur) create an additional homestead exemption for certain public employees if HJR 1, SJR 1746 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. The bills provide for an additional homestead exemption up to $50,000 on the assessed value greater than $100,000 and up to $150,000 for properties owned by a classroom teacher, a law enforcement officer, a correctional officer, a firefighter, a child welfare service provider, an active-duty member of the United States Armed Services or a member of the Florida National Guard. These bills only apply to non-school property taxes. (Hughes)

Infrastructure Project Funding/Transfers of Utility Revenues (Oppose)

HB 621 (Fine) and SB 1162 (Broxson) prohibit specified state agencies and water management districts from disbursing state funds (including grants) for local government infrastructure, water and resiliency projects if the local government transfers its utility revenues (other than the costs of administrative and support services under a cost allocation plan) for use in providing general government functions and services. (Branch) ...

HB 621 (Fine) and SB 1162 (Broxson) prohibit specified state agencies and water management districts from disbursing state funds (including grants) for local government infrastructure, water and resiliency projects if the local government transfers its utility revenues (other than the costs of administrative and support services under a cost allocation plan) for use in providing general government functions and services. (Branch)

Local Government Solid Waste and Recycling Collection Services (Oppose)

SB 1944 (Baxley) and HB 1241 (Hawkins) prohibit local governments from seeking liquidated damages, administrative fees or other similar charges against a solid waste management or recycling entity for action or inaction during a local, state or federal emergency. The bills also cap the amount of liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges that may be sought against a waste or recycling company to 50% of the amount billed to the customer for collection services at the daily rate. SB 1944 applies to contracts executed or renewed on or after July 1, 2022; HB 1241 applies retroactively ...

SB 1944 (Baxley) and HB 1241 (Hawkins) prohibit local governments from seeking liquidated damages, administrative fees or other similar charges against a solid waste management or recycling entity for action or inaction during a local, state or federal emergency. The bills also cap the amount of liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges that may be sought against a waste or recycling company to 50% of the amount billed to the customer for collection services at the daily rate. SB 1944 applies to contracts executed or renewed on or after July 1, 2022; HB 1241 applies retroactively to existing contracts. (O'Hara)

Local Ordinances (Support)

CS/CS/SB 280 (Hutson) and HB 403 (Giallombardo) impose new substantive requirements on municipalities for adopting and enforcing ordinances. First, the bills require a municipality to prepare a business impact estimate before adopting an ordinance and specifies the minimum content that must be included in the statement. The bills various ordinances from this requirement. The estimate must be posted on the municipality’s website no later than the date of publication of notice of the proposed ordinance. Second, the bills require a municipality to suspend enforcement of an ordinance that is the subject of a civil action challenging the ordinance’s ...

CS/CS/SB 280 (Hutson) and HB 403 (Giallombardo) impose new substantive requirements on municipalities for adopting and enforcing ordinances. First, the bills require a municipality to prepare a business impact estimate before adopting an ordinance and specifies the minimum content that must be included in the statement. The bills various ordinances from this requirement. The estimate must be posted on the municipality’s website no later than the date of publication of notice of the proposed ordinance. Second, the bills require a municipality to suspend enforcement of an ordinance that is the subject of a civil action challenging the ordinance’s validity on grounds that it is arbitrary or unreasonable or expressly preempted by state law. This requirement applies only if: the action was filed within 90 days of the ordinance’s effective date; suspension of the ordinance was requested in the complaint; and the municipality was served with a copy of the complaint. If the municipality prevails in the civil action and an appeal is taken, the bills authorize the court to consider continuing or lifting the stay of enforcement of the ordinance. Third, the bills authorize the award of attorney fees, costs and damages to a prevailing plaintiff in a civil action commenced after October 1, 2022, in which an ordinance is alleged to be arbitrary or unreasonable. The bills require courts to prioritize and expedite the disposition of cases in which enforcement of an ordinance is suspended. The bills exempt various ordinances from the stay of enforcement provision. (O’Hara)

Mandatory Building Inspections (Watch)

SB 1702 (Bradley) does the following: ...

SB 1702 (Bradley) does the following: •Creates a statewide structural inspection program for aging multifamily residential buildings •Defines the term "milestone inspection" to mean a structural inspection of a building by a licensed architect or engineer authorized to practice in this state for the purposes of attesting to the life safety and adequacy of the structural components •Makes known that the cost associated with the inspections are the responsibility of the condominium owner or association •Requires multifamily residential buildings that are greater than three stories in height to have a milestone inspection performed by December 31 of the year in which the building reaches 30 years of age and every ten years thereafter. •Requires multifamily residential buildings located within 3 miles of a coastline and are greater than three stories in height to have a milestone inspection performed by December 31 of the year in which the building reaches 20 years of age and every seven years thereafter •Requires any multifamily residential building whose certificate of occupancy was issued on or before July 1, 1992, to have their initial milestone inspection performed before December 31, 2024 •Requires the architect or engineer who performed the inspection to submit a sealed copy of the report to each condominium unit owner and to the building official of the local government of jurisdiction •Allows the local enforcement agency the ability to prescribe timelines and penalties with respect to compliance with the above section •Requires the Florida Building Commission to develop comprehensive structural and life safety standards for maintaining and inspecting all building types and structures by December 31, 2022. (Branch)

Municipal Water and Sewer Utility Rates (Oppose)

SB 886 (Jones) and HB 515 (Robinson, F.) require a municipal water or sewer utility that serves customers in another recipient municipality using infrastructure located in the recipient municipality to charge consumers in the recipient municipality the same rates, fees and charges as it does the consumers inside its municipal boundaries. (Branch) ...

SB 886 (Jones) and HB 515 (Robinson, F.) require a municipal water or sewer utility that serves customers in another recipient municipality using infrastructure located in the recipient municipality to charge consumers in the recipient municipality the same rates, fees and charges as it does the consumers inside its municipal boundaries. (Branch)

Residential Home Protection (Support)

SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and clarify the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. (O'Hara) ...

SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and clarify the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. (O'Hara)

Soil and Groundwater Contamination (Support)

SB 1418 (Albritton) and HB 1475 (McClure) require the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt rules for statewide cleanup target levels for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in soil and groundwater. Such rules may not take effect until ratified by the Legislature. Until the rules for a particular PFAS constituent have been ratified by the Legislature, a person may not be subject to enforcement action by any state or local government entity to compel or enjoin site rehabilitation for that PFAS constituent. In addition, SB 1418 requires the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability to conduct ...

SB 1418 (Albritton) and HB 1475 (McClure) require the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt rules for statewide cleanup target levels for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in soil and groundwater. Such rules may not take effect until ratified by the Legislature. Until the rules for a particular PFAS constituent have been ratified by the Legislature, a person may not be subject to enforcement action by any state or local government entity to compel or enjoin site rehabilitation for that PFAS constituent. In addition, SB 1418 requires the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability to conduct an analysis of assessment and cleanup programs used in other states and submit a report to the Governor and Legislature by a specified date. (O'Hara)

Sovereign Immunity (Oppose)

SB 974 (Gruters) and CS/HB 985 (Beltran) revise the statutory limits on liability for tort claims against the state and its agencies and subdivisions (which include cities). The bills seek to increase the current statutory limits for claims from $200,000 per person and $300,000 per incident to $1 million per person and no per-incident cap. Beginning July 1, 2023, the legislation would tie the revised limit to a consumer price index to automatically increase with inflation every year. CS/HB 985 was amended to shorten the timeframe for a government entity to make final disposition of a claim from ...

SB 974 (Gruters) and CS/HB 985 (Beltran) revise the statutory limits on liability for tort claims against the state and its agencies and subdivisions (which include cities). The bills seek to increase the current statutory limits for claims from $200,000 per person and $300,000 per incident to $1 million per person and no per-incident cap. Beginning July 1, 2023, the legislation would tie the revised limit to a consumer price index to automatically increase with inflation every year. CS/HB 985 was amended to shorten the timeframe for a government entity to make final disposition of a claim from six months to three months. The bills will retroactively apply these new limits to any pending claims that have not been settled by the effective date of the bill (July 1, 2022). (Cruz)

Vacation Rentals (Watch)

SB 512 (Burgess) and HB 325 (Fischer)  ...

SB 512 (Burgess) and HB 325 (Fischer)  Impact on Local Governments The bills maintain the current preemption on local governments from adopting zoning ordinances specific to short-term rentals, as well as regulating the duration of stays and the frequency in which the properties are rented. The bills expand this preemption to include local regulations on advertising platforms. For cities that adopted ordinances prior to June 1, 2011, the bills maintain the "grandfather" currently in place but clarify that those cities may amend their ordinances to be less restrictive or to comply with a local registration program. For cities that do not have "grandfathered" protections, the bills preempt cities from licensing short-term rentals; however, they authorize local governments to have a local registration program.  Local governments who choose to adopt a local registration program may impose a fine for failure to register. The local government has 15 days after receiving an application for registration to either accept the application or issue a written notice specifying all deficiencies. Both parties may agree to extend the timeline. If a municipality does not accept or deny an application within that 15-day window, that application is deemed approved. As a condition of registration, the local registration programs may only require the owner or operator of a vacation rental to: •Pay a fee of no more than $50 for processing the registration application. •Renew their registration no more than once per year unless the property has a change in ownership.  •Submit identifying information about the owner or the property manager and the short-term rental being registered. •Obtain a license as a transient public lodging establishment by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) within 60 days of local registration. •Obtain all required tax registration, receipts or certificates issued by the Department of Revenue, a county or a municipal government.  •Maintain all registration information on a continuing basis so it is current. •Comply with parking and solid waste handling requirements. These requirements cannot be imposed solely on short-term rentals. •Designate and maintain a property designee who can respond to complaints and other immediate problems related to the property, including being available by phone. •Pay in full all municipal or county code liens against the property being registered.  Impact on Advertising Platforms and DBPR Advertising platforms must include in all listings the property's state license number, and if applicable, the local registration number. After July 1, 2023, the advertising platform will be required to check and verify the license number of all listings with DBPR. Additionally, by that date, DBPR will be required to maintain all short-term rental license information in an electronic format to ensure prompt compliance. Advertising platforms will be required to remove unlicensed listings within 15 days after notification by DBPR, as well as collect and remit all required taxes.  Termination/Denial of License DBPR may revoke, refuse to issue or renew a short-term rental license or suspend the license for up to 30 days under several circumstances: •The property owner violates the terms of any lease or applicable condominium, coop or homeowner's association restrictions.  •The owner fails to provide proof of local registration if one is required. •The local registration is terminated by a local government for violating any of the registration requirements described above. •The property and property owner are subject to a final order or judgment directing termination of the properties short-term rental status. •DBPR may also suspend the license for up to 30 days when the short-term rental has been cited for two or more code enforcement violations during a 90-day period. (Taggart)

BUILDING CODE/CONSTRUCTION

Community Associations’ Building Inspections (Watch)

SB 1780 (Pizzo) and HB 1391 (Geller) address inspection requirements for community associations. Of interest to municipalities, the bills require each association to include in their bylaws the following: for a building that is four stories or more and located within a one-half mile radius of the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, the Board must have the building inspected by a licensed architect or engineer once the building reaches 30 years of age and every five years thereafter, and provide that report to the local authority having jurisdiction. (Branch) ...

SB 1780 (Pizzo) and HB 1391 (Geller) address inspection requirements for community associations. Of interest to municipalities, the bills require each association to include in their bylaws the following: for a building that is four stories or more and located within a one-half mile radius of the Gulf of Mexico or the Atlantic Ocean, the Board must have the building inspected by a licensed architect or engineer once the building reaches 30 years of age and every five years thereafter, and provide that report to the local authority having jurisdiction. (Branch)

Condominium and Cooperative Associations (Watch)

SB 1942 (Pizzo) and HB 1393 (Geller) address inspection and reserve requirements for community associations. Of interest to municipalities, the bills: ...

SB 1942 (Pizzo) and HB 1393 (Geller) address inspection and reserve requirements for community associations. Of interest to municipalities, the bills: •Require the local jurisdiction to issue a notice or required recertification inspection to the association when the condominium building is 20 years of age or older •Requiresthe architect or engineer who performed the inspection to submit a sealed copy of the report to the local authority within seven days after the board receives the completed report •Require the Condominium Board to complete any repairs or modifications within six months after receipt of the recertification report according to the Florida Building Code •Requires the Board, under a seal signature of a licensed architect or engineer and within seven days of the completion of repairs or modifications, to provide the local authority a copy affirming that the remedial action has been completed •Require the Board of Directors to provide a copy of the reserve study or financial statement to the local authority having jurisdiction within a specified time •Authorize the local authority having jurisdiction to order a mandatory evacuation of the residential condominium under certain circumstances. (Branch)

Building Inspection Services (Watch)

HB 423 (LaMarca) and SB 644 (Brodeur) does the following: ...

HB 423 (LaMarca) and SB 644 (Brodeur) does the following: •Increase the minimum hours of training required in multifamily training programs for a fire safety inspector to qualify to take the building inspector or plans examiner certification exam. •Allow those that have completed a four-year internship certification program with a private provider (instead of with a local government) to qualify to take the building inspector or plans examiner certification exam. •Prohibit the Florida Building Code Administrators and Inspectors Board from requiring employment with a local government as a condition for the issuance of a provisional certificate. •Clarify that applicants that use private providers can only be charged permit fees based on the costs actually incurred by the local government to process the permit. •Require that local governments give private providers equal access to permitting and inspection documents.  •Require building officials to issue occupancy or completion certificates within 10 days of a "deemed granted" certificate. (Branch)

Building Plan Changes (Watch)

SB 1020 (Perry), SB 976 (Perry) and HB 635 (Maggard) prohibit local building code administrators, inspectors and fire safety marshals from making changes to certain building plans under specified circumstances once the local building department has approved and sealed the plans.  ...

SB 1020 (Perry), SB 976 (Perry) and HB 635 (Maggard) prohibit local building code administrators, inspectors and fire safety marshals from making changes to certain building plans under specified circumstances once the local building department has approved and sealed the plans.  HB 1281 (DiCeglie) and SB 976 prohibit any governmental entity from requiring participation in a paid subscription service to access solicitations of competitive bids or proposals which must be publicly advertised. The bills require that such solicitations be available on the publicly accessible website of the applicable governmental entity after the solicitation has been advertised. (Branch)

Education (Oppose)

SB 758 (Diaz) and HB 865 (Rizo) create the Charter School Review Commission within the Florida Department of Education. Of concern to cities, the bills would remove the requirement that any facility used as a charter school obtain a special exemption from existing zoning and land use designations. (Branch) ...

SB 758 (Diaz) and HB 865 (Rizo) create the Charter School Review Commission within the Florida Department of Education. Of concern to cities, the bills would remove the requirement that any facility used as a charter school obtain a special exemption from existing zoning and land use designations. (Branch)

Mandatory Building Inspections (Watch)

SB 1702 (Bradley) does the following: ...

SB 1702 (Bradley) does the following: •Creates a statewide structural inspection program for aging multifamily residential buildings •Defines the term "milestone inspection" to mean a structural inspection of a building by a licensed architect or engineer authorized to practice in this state for the purposes of attesting to the life safety and adequacy of the structural components •Makes known that the cost associated with the inspections are the responsibility of the condominium owner or association •Requires multifamily residential buildings that are greater than three stories in height to have a milestone inspection performed by December 31 of the year in which the building reaches 30 years of age and every ten years thereafter  •Requires multifamily residential buildings located within three miles of a coastline and are greater than three stories in height to have a milestone inspection performed by December 31 of the year in which the building reaches 20 years of age and every seven years thereafter •Requires any multifamily residential building whose certificate of occupancy was issued on or before July 1, 1992, to have their initial milestone inspection performed before December 31, 2024 •Requires the architect or engineer who performed the inspection to submit a sealed copy of the report to each condominium unit owner and to the building official of the local government of jurisdiction •Allows the local enforcement agency the ability to prescribe timelines and penalties with respect to compliance with the above section •Requires the Florida Building Commission to develop comprehensive structural and life safety standards for maintaining and inspecting all building types and structures by December 31, 2022. (Branch)

Repeal of Developer Incentive Requirements (Support) 

HB 6057 (Eskamani) removes provisions requiring counties and municipalities to provide incentives to fully offset the costs of certain affordable housing contributions or linkage fees. (Branch) ...

HB 6057 (Eskamani) removes provisions requiring counties and municipalities to provide incentives to fully offset the costs of certain affordable housing contributions or linkage fees. (Branch)

Road Construction (Watch)

HB 1365 (Maggard) and SB 1784 (Burgess) create the Rural Roads Initiative Pilot Program within the Florida Department of Transportation with the purpose of paving state, county or municipal roads within East Pasco County that are currently unpaved. Within the program, Pasco County Board of County Commissioners or the governing board of a municipality within East Pasco County may apply to the Department of Transportation for funding to pave roads that are currently unpaved and the cost of which cannot be met by the residents. The bills specify that a road paving project funded under the program is ...

HB 1365 (Maggard) and SB 1784 (Burgess) create the Rural Roads Initiative Pilot Program within the Florida Department of Transportation with the purpose of paving state, county or municipal roads within East Pasco County that are currently unpaved. Within the program, Pasco County Board of County Commissioners or the governing board of a municipality within East Pasco County may apply to the Department of Transportation for funding to pave roads that are currently unpaved and the cost of which cannot be met by the residents. The bills specify that a road paving project funded under the program is subject only to construction standards established by the county or the municipality in which the road is located and is not subject to department standards. (Branch)

Standards for Buildings and Firesafety (Watch) 

HB 626 (Wright) and SB 659 (Harding) change the effective date of the Florida Fire Prevention Code so that the Code will take effect no sooner than six months after the latest occurrence of the publication of the updated Florida Building Code. (Branch) ...

HB 626 (Wright) and SB 659 (Harding) change the effective date of the Florida Fire Prevention Code so that the Code will take effect no sooner than six months after the latest occurrence of the publication of the updated Florida Building Code. (Branch)

Powers of the Florida Building Commission (Watch) 

SB 1604 (Perry) and HB 771 (Andrade) require the Florida Building Commission to develop uniform standards for the maintenance and periodic inspections of existing building structures and facilities across the state. (Branch) ...

SB 1604 (Perry) and HB 771 (Andrade) require the Florida Building Commission to develop uniform standards for the maintenance and periodic inspections of existing building structures and facilities across the state. (Branch)

Other Bills of Interest

SB 352 (Hooper) – Construction Liens ...

SB 352 (Hooper) – Construction Liens HB 263 (Bell) – Notice of Commencement Requirements HB 1397 (Geller) and SB 1774 (Pizzo) – Condominium Associations

CYBERSECURITY

Critical Infrastructure Standards and Procedures (Oppose)

SB 828 (Hutson) requires local governments who operate critical infrastructure to have those systems and controls comply with and meet operational standards as defined in the ISA/IED 62443 series of standards as determined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework by July 1, 2024. ISA/IED 62443 standards are an international series of standards for industrial communication networks and systems developed by the International Society of Automation. The bill also requires local governments who operate these systems to conduct an annual risk assessment and create a mitigation plan. Systems that fall under these requirements include, ...

SB 828 (Hutson) requires local governments who operate critical infrastructure to have those systems and controls comply with and meet operational standards as defined in the ISA/IED 62443 series of standards as determined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework by July 1, 2024. ISA/IED 62443 standards are an international series of standards for industrial communication networks and systems developed by the International Society of Automation. The bill also requires local governments who operate these systems to conduct an annual risk assessment and create a mitigation plan. Systems that fall under these requirements include, but are not limited to, public transportation, water and wastewater treatment facilities, public utilities, public services subject to jurisdiction by the Public Service Commission, and public buildings. By July 1, 2026, when local governments procure automation and control system components, services, or solutions, or when contracting for facility upgrades for critical infrastructure, the local government must require those new components or services to meet the ISA/IEC 62443 standards. Additionally, the bill specifies civil penalties for noncompliance if a local government does not make a good-faith effort to comply with these standards and an incident occurs.  HB 1147 (Giallombardo) is similar to SB 828 but has different implementing requirements and timelines. By July 1, 2022, when local governments procure automation and control system components, services, or solutions, or when contracting for facility upgrades for critical infrastructure, the local government must require those new components or services to meet the ISA/IEC 62443 standards. The main difference in these two bills is that HB 1147 encourages local governments who operate critical infrastructure to, by July 1, 2022, have those systems and controls comply with and meet operational standards as defined in the ISA/IED 62443 series of standards as determined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cybersecurity Framework. The bill also encourages asset owners to annually conduct a risk assessment and create a risk mitigation plan.  (Taggart)

Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance (Support)

HB 9241 (Giallombardo) would provide a nonrecurring sum of $5 million to fund the Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance. This funding would create a program for Cyber Florida to offer threat assessments and grant funding to help local governments update their information technology. (Taggart)  ...

HB 9241 (Giallombardo) would provide a nonrecurring sum of $5 million to fund the Cyber Florida - Local Government Infrastructure and Technical Assistance. This funding would create a program for Cyber Florida to offer threat assessments and grant funding to help local governments update their information technology. (Taggart)

Cybersecurity (Watch)

SB 1670 (Hutson) requires each local government by January 1, 2024, to adopt cybersecurity standards for all information technology (IT) and operational technology, that comply with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework that is appropriate for the size of the organization. At a minimum, these standards must include routine backups of critical information and multifactor authentication. The bill also requires local governments to:  ...

SB 1670 (Hutson) requires each local government by January 1, 2024, to adopt cybersecurity standards for all information technology (IT) and operational technology, that comply with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) cybersecurity framework that is appropriate for the size of the organization. At a minimum, these standards must include routine backups of critical information and multifactor authentication. The bill also requires local governments to:  •Conduct vulnerability testing of its IT and operational technology at least every two years •Require all employees with access to a local government network to receive training when they begin employment and at intervals that will be specified by the Florida Digital Service •Require all local government IT professionals and persons with access to highly sensitive information to undergo intensive cybersecurity training  •Report all attacks on a computer or network, including ransomware attacks and data breaches, to the State Watch Office within the Division of Emergency Management. "Attacks" is not defined in the bill.  The bill directs the Florida Digital Service and the Florida Cybersecurity Advisory Council to develop the training requirements and conduct the trainings virtually at certain times of the year. Local governments will be required to report all ransomware incidents to the State Watch Office, Florida Digital Service, the Executive Office of the Governor, the Department of Law Enforcement and the local law enforcement agency within 12 hours of discovery. The bill requires local governments to communicate with the Florida Digital Service and the local law enforcement agencies prior to paying a ransom if a ransomware incident occurs. The bill also requires the Florida Digital Service to create a checklist for local governments to utilize while responding to ransomware incidents. Finally, the bill allocates $1 million in recurring funding to Florida Digital Service to disburse funds to local governments for the training required under the bill. (Taggart)

Public Records/Criminal Intelligence Information or Criminal Investigative Information (Watch)

SB 1694 (Hutson) exempts from public record any criminal intelligence information that reveals information that could allow unauthorized access to any electronic device, software or network. (Taggart)  ...

SB 1694 (Hutson) exempts from public record any criminal intelligence information that reveals information that could allow unauthorized access to any electronic device, software or network. (Taggart)

Public Records and Public Meetings/Certain Information Held by a Utility (Support)

SB 1740 (Wright) and HB 1287 (Botana) provide an exemption from public records information  ...

SB 1740 (Wright) and HB 1287 (Botana) provide an exemption from public records information  related to threat technology and operational technology systems of a utility owned or operated by a unit of local government, including but not limited to plans and actions made or taken in response to a ransomware attack or other cyberattack. The bills also exempt from public record information related to insurance or other risk mitigation products or coverages, including but not limited to deductible or self-insurance amounts, coverage limits, and policy terms and conditions. (Taggart)

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Agreements with Professional Sports Teams (Watch)

HB 499 (Gregory) and SB 1298 (Gruters) require agreements between a governmental entity and a professional sports team or sporting event entered into after July 1, 2022, to include a requirement that the U.S. National Anthem be played at the beginning of each sporting event if the agreement includes a financial commitment from the governmental agency. The government that enters into the agreement would be responsible for enforcing this requirement. The bills also specify penalties for the sports entity for failure to comply. (Taggart) ...

HB 499 (Gregory) and SB 1298 (Gruters) require agreements between a governmental entity and a professional sports team or sporting event entered into after July 1, 2022, to include a requirement that the U.S. National Anthem be played at the beginning of each sporting event if the agreement includes a financial commitment from the governmental agency. The government that enters into the agreement would be responsible for enforcing this requirement. The bills also specify penalties for the sports entity for failure to comply. (Taggart)

Florida Tourism Marketing (Support)

SB 434 (Hooper) and HB 489 (Chaney) delay the scheduled repeal of the Florida Tourism Industry Marketing Corporation (Visit Florida) and the Division of Tourism Marketing of Enterprise Florida, Inc. SB 434 delays the repeal from 2023 to 2031, while HB 489 delays the repeal from 2023 to 2028. (Taggart) ...

SB 434 (Hooper) and HB 489 (Chaney) delay the scheduled repeal of the Florida Tourism Industry Marketing Corporation (Visit Florida) and the Division of Tourism Marketing of Enterprise Florida, Inc. SB 434 delays the repeal from 2023 to 2031, while HB 489 delays the repeal from 2023 to 2028. (Taggart)

Rural Economic Development (Support)

SB 800 (Albritton) and HB 685 (Drake) authorize municipalities to exempt by ordinance the public service tax on electrical energy for qualified purchasers determined by the Department of Revenue (DOR). The bills also provide a sales tax exemption for building materials being used to revitalize real property located within an opportunity zone. The bills specify that the sales tax exemption will be distributed in the form of a refund on previously paid taxes if the property owner, lessee, or lessor files an application with the local government that the opportunity zone is located. The bills specify the information ...

SB 800 (Albritton) and HB 685 (Drake) authorize municipalities to exempt by ordinance the public service tax on electrical energy for qualified purchasers determined by the Department of Revenue (DOR). The bills also provide a sales tax exemption for building materials being used to revitalize real property located within an opportunity zone. The bills specify that the sales tax exemption will be distributed in the form of a refund on previously paid taxes if the property owner, lessee, or lessor files an application with the local government that the opportunity zone is located. The bills specify the information that the applicant will be required to provide in their application to the local government and give the local government ten business days to certify the application for completeness and transmit it to DOR. The applicant is also required to forward the application to DOR. Applications for a sales tax refund must be submitted to DOR within six months of the real property being deemed "substantially completed" by the local building inspector. Applicants are limited to one application per property, and the amount must exceed $500. Additionally, the bills expand this tax exemption to include electrical energy being used by a business that operates in an opportunity zone for up to 50% of the tax imposed if the municipality chooses to adopt an ordinance. The bills also modify some parameters of the Rural Job Tax Credit Program by removing the minimum number of employees and increasing the tax credit per employee from $1,000 to $2,500. The bills also create the Rural Opportunity Tax Refund Program intended to provide tax relief for new, qualified targeted businesses that bring economic diversity and high-wage jobs to rural areas. In order for a qualified targeted business to receive this tax benefit, the municipality where the business will be located must adopt a resolution recommending the applicant be approved. (Taggart)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 202 (Farmer) – Small Business Website Development Grant Program ...

HB 202 (Farmer) – Small Business Website Development Grant Program HB 217 (Trabulsy) and SB 946 (Trabulsy) – Film, Television and Digital Media Rebate Program HB 247 (Salzman) and HB 1310 (Rodriguez, A.) – Florida Main Street Program and Historic Preservation Tax Credits HB 359 (Eskamani) – Agreement for Best Practices in Economic Development SB 1098 (Brodeur) and HB 835 (Duggan) – Smart Region Zones HB 6059 (Eskamani) ad SB 1896 (Farmer) – Confidentiality of Economic Development Agreement Information

ETHICS & ELECTIONS

Campaign Finance (Watch)

HB 1359 (Roach) provides that a political committee or electioneering communications organization that over a 24-month period does not make or receive expenditures or contributions exceeding $5,000 in the aggregate is dissolved and must dispose of surplus funds in accordance with the Florida Elections Code. The bill also revises campaign contribution limits for candidates for legislative office, the Governor and members of the cabinet. (O'Hara) ...

HB 1359 (Roach) provides that a political committee or electioneering communications organization that over a 24-month period does not make or receive expenditures or contributions exceeding $5,000 in the aggregate is dissolved and must dispose of surplus funds in accordance with the Florida Elections Code. The bill also revises campaign contribution limits for candidates for legislative office, the Governor and members of the cabinet. (O'Hara)

Campaign Finance (Support)

HB 6109 (Eskamani) removes provisions that preempt local governments from enacting or adopting limitations and restrictions involving certain contributions and expenditures or establishing contribution limits different than those established in the Florida Election Code. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6109 (Eskamani) removes provisions that preempt local governments from enacting or adopting limitations and restrictions involving certain contributions and expenditures or establishing contribution limits different than those established in the Florida Election Code. (O'Hara)

Elections (Oppose)

SB 524 (Hutson) amends various provisions of the Florida Election Code. The bill prohibits the use of ranked-choice voting to determine election or nomination to elective office and voids existing or future local ordinances authorizing the use of ranked-choice voting. It removes the limitation on the amount of aggregate fines that may be assessed against a third-party voter registration organization and revises the candidate oath regarding outstanding fines, fees or penalties owed for certain ethics or campaign finance violations. The bill authorizes a supervisor of elections to designate up to two additional early voting sites per election. (O'Hara) ...

SB 524 (Hutson) amends various provisions of the Florida Election Code. The bill prohibits the use of ranked-choice voting to determine election or nomination to elective office and voids existing or future local ordinances authorizing the use of ranked-choice voting. It removes the limitation on the amount of aggregate fines that may be assessed against a third-party voter registration organization and revises the candidate oath regarding outstanding fines, fees or penalties owed for certain ethics or campaign finance violations. The bill authorizes a supervisor of elections to designate up to two additional early voting sites per election. (O'Hara)

Fiduciary Duty of Care for Appointed Public Officials and Executive Officers (Oppose)

SB 508 (Diaz) establishes standards of conduct and a mandatory five hours of training relating to the "fiduciary duty of care" for appointed local public officers and executive officers of local government entities. In addition, the bills impose restrictions on legal representation by government attorneys. The fiduciary duty and training requirements apply to appointed officials of various local boards and committees, including code enforcement boards, planning and zoning boards, land use boards and community redevelopment agency boards. The requirements do not apply to pension board members. The bill provides that each appointed public official and executive officer has ...

SB 508 (Diaz) establishes standards of conduct and a mandatory five hours of training relating to the "fiduciary duty of care" for appointed local public officers and executive officers of local government entities. In addition, the bills impose restrictions on legal representation by government attorneys. The fiduciary duty and training requirements apply to appointed officials of various local boards and committees, including code enforcement boards, planning and zoning boards, land use boards and community redevelopment agency boards. The requirements do not apply to pension board members. The bill provides that each appointed public official and executive officer has a fiduciary duty of care to the governmental entity served and has a duty to act in accordance with laws and terms governing the office or employment, act with the care and competence normally exercised by private business professionals, act only within the scope of authority and refrain from conduct likely to damage the economic interests of the governmental entity. Further, such persons must become reasonably informed in connection with any decision-making function and keep reasonably informed concerning the performance of a governmental entity's officers, agents and employees. The bill imposes training requirements on appointed public officers and executive officers that require completion of at least five hours of board governance training per term served. The bill specifies the minimum content of such training programs, including board governance best practices and fiduciary duty of care and liabilities imposed by the new law. The bill provides that all legal counsel employed by a governmental entity must represent the legal interest and position of the governing body of the governmental entity and not the interest of any individual or employee of the governmental entity. (Cruz)

Implementation of the Constitutional Prohibition Against Lobbying by a Public Officer (Support)

HB 7001 (Public Integrity & Elections Committee) provides implementing legislation for the constitutional amendment approved by voters in 2018 that prohibits lobbying by certain state and local public officers both during public service and for a six-year period following vacation of public office. The constitutional prohibitions address lobbying before the federal government, the legislature, any state agency, or any political subdivision and takes effect December 31, 2022. The bill provides definitions of terms that are not defined in the constitutional provision, giving needed clarity for state and local public officers. Notable definitions in the bill include: "lobby," "compensation" ...

HB 7001 (Public Integrity & Elections Committee) provides implementing legislation for the constitutional amendment approved by voters in 2018 that prohibits lobbying by certain state and local public officers both during public service and for a six-year period following vacation of public office. The constitutional prohibitions address lobbying before the federal government, the legislature, any state agency, or any political subdivision and takes effect December 31, 2022. The bill provides definitions of terms that are not defined in the constitutional provision, giving needed clarity for state and local public officers. Notable definitions in the bill include: "lobby," "compensation" and "legislative action," "issue of policy," "issue of procurement," "issue of appropriation," "administrative action," lobbying before the federal government and lobbying before political subdivisions. The bill provides specified exemptions from the definition of lobbying. The definitions included in the bill should be helpful to local and state public officials whose private-sector employment requires them to render legal services for clients before various state and political subdivisions. (O'Hara)

FINANCE & TAXATION

Abatement of Taxes for Residential Dwellings Rendered Uninhabitable by Catastrophic Event (Watch)

HB 71 (Woodson) and SB 568 (Polsky) create an abatement of property taxes for residential dwellings that are uninhabitable due to a catastrophic event. If a residential dwelling is rendered uninhabitable for at least 30 days due to a catastrophic event, taxes originally levied for the tax year in which the catastrophic event occurred may be abated if certain conditions are met. The bills require the tax collector to notify each affected local government of the reduction of property taxes due to this bill. This change would apply retroactively to January 1, 2021. (Hughes) ...

HB 71 (Woodson) and SB 568 (Polsky) create an abatement of property taxes for residential dwellings that are uninhabitable due to a catastrophic event. If a residential dwelling is rendered uninhabitable for at least 30 days due to a catastrophic event, taxes originally levied for the tax year in which the catastrophic event occurred may be abated if certain conditions are met. The bills require the tax collector to notify each affected local government of the reduction of property taxes due to this bill. This change would apply retroactively to January 1, 2021. (Hughes)

Ad Valorem Tax Exemption for Nonprofit Homes for the Aged (Watch)

SB 362 (Rodriguez) and HB 401 (Smith) expand options that would allow a nonprofit home for the aged to qualify for an exemption from ad valorem taxation. (Hughes) ...

SB 362 (Rodriguez) and HB 401 (Smith) expand options that would allow a nonprofit home for the aged to qualify for an exemption from ad valorem taxation. (Hughes)

Agritourism (Watch) 

HB 717 (Tomkow) and SB 1186 (Albritton) prohibit the denial or revocations of a property's agricultural classification due solely to the conduct of agritourism or the construction of a nonresidential structure on a bona fide farm that is used to conduct agritourism activities. The nonresidential structures and other improvements to the land must be assessed at their just value and added to the agriculturally assessed value of the land. (Hughes) ...

HB 717 (Tomkow) and SB 1186 (Albritton) prohibit the denial or revocations of a property's agricultural classification due solely to the conduct of agritourism or the construction of a nonresidential structure on a bona fide farm that is used to conduct agritourism activities. The nonresidential structures and other improvements to the land must be assessed at their just value and added to the agriculturally assessed value of the land. (Hughes)

Constitutional Amendment: Homestead Exemption (Oppose)

SJR 1266 (Brandes) and HJR 923 (Fischer) propose an amendment to the Florida Constitution to provide for the periodic increase of the twenty-five thousand dollar exemption on a homestead property's assessed value that is greater than fifty thousand dollars. (Hughes) ...

SJR 1266 (Brandes) and HJR 923 (Fischer) propose an amendment to the Florida Constitution to provide for the periodic increase of the twenty-five thousand dollar exemption on a homestead property's assessed value that is greater than fifty thousand dollars. (Hughes)

Implementing Bill: Homestead Exemption (Oppose)

SB 1264 (Brandes) and HB 1503 (Fischer) provide for the periodic increase in the additional property tax exemption on a homestead property if SJR 1266 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. The bills would provide for recalculations of the additional homestead every five years and indexes the exemption amount to the House Price Index for Florida. (Hughes) ...

SB 1264 (Brandes) and HB 1503 (Fischer) provide for the periodic increase in the additional property tax exemption on a homestead property if SJR 1266 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. The bills would provide for recalculations of the additional homestead every five years and indexes the exemption amount to the House Price Index for Florida. (Hughes)

Government Property Tax Exemption (Watch)

SB 1890 (Hutson) revises the types of lessees whose purpose and functions are deemed to be governmental, municipal or public purpose in determining the exemption from as valorem taxes for certain real property. These changes are intended to clarify existing law. (Hughes)  ...

SB 1890 (Hutson) revises the types of lessees whose purpose and functions are deemed to be governmental, municipal or public purpose in determining the exemption from as valorem taxes for certain real property. These changes are intended to clarify existing law. (Hughes)

Homestead Assessments Following a Change in Ownership (Oppose) 

HB 283 (Duran) and SB 460 (Rodriguez) provide for an exception from assessment of homestead property at just value upon transfer of property if the property is transferred to a child or a grandchild of the deceased owner. (Hughes) ...

HB 283 (Duran) and SB 460 (Rodriguez) provide for an exception from assessment of homestead property at just value upon transfer of property if the property is transferred to a child or a grandchild of the deceased owner. (Hughes)

Homestead Property Tax Assessment Limitation and Exemptions for Low-Income Seniors (Watch)

HJR 973 (Borrero) and SJR 1278 (Diaz) propose amendments to the Florida Constitution to authorize the legislature to prohibit increases in the assessed value of homestead property owned by low-income seniors. (Hughes) ...

HJR 973 (Borrero) and SJR 1278 (Diaz) propose amendments to the Florida Constitution to authorize the legislature to prohibit increases in the assessed value of homestead property owned by low-income seniors. (Hughes)

Implementing Bills: Homestead Property Tax Assessment Limitation and Exemptions for Low-Income Seniors (Watch)

HB 975 (Borrero) and SB 1280 (Diaz) create an additional assessment limitation for certain low-income seniors if HJR 973, SJR 1278 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. This additional assessment limitation applies to assessed values of homestead properties with a just value of $300,000 or less owned by a person at least 65 years old whose annual household income does not exceed $20,000. The assessment limitation carries over to a surviving spouse who uses the property as a homestead, who has attained age 65 and meets the household income ...

HB 975 (Borrero) and SB 1280 (Diaz) create an additional assessment limitation for certain low-income seniors if HJR 973, SJR 1278 or a similar constitutional amendment is approved by the voters at the 2022 general election. This additional assessment limitation applies to assessed values of homestead properties with a just value of $300,000 or less owned by a person at least 65 years old whose annual household income does not exceed $20,000. The assessment limitation carries over to a surviving spouse who uses the property as a homestead, who has attained age 65 and meets the household income limitations. The bills also modify the current local option low-income senior property tax exemption to increase the just value requirement from $250,000 to $300,000. (Hughes)

Local Tax Referenda Requirements (Oppose)

CS/HB 777 (Robinson) and CS/SB 1194 (Boyd) require referenda elections related to tourist development taxes, tourist impact taxes, increases in municipal and county ad valorem tax millages, children's services and independent special district property taxes, ninth-cent fuel tax, local option fuel taxes and certain school millages to be held at the general election. (Hughes)  ...

CS/HB 777 (Robinson) and CS/SB 1194 (Boyd) require referenda elections related to tourist development taxes, tourist impact taxes, increases in municipal and county ad valorem tax millages, children's services and independent special district property taxes, ninth-cent fuel tax, local option fuel taxes and certain school millages to be held at the general election. (Hughes)

Property Appraisers (Watch)

HB 417 (Fernandez-Barquin) and SB 572 (Garcia) revise factors that a property appraiser must consider in deriving just valuation for a property. For example, the property appraiser may not consider the highest and best use if the necessary zoning changes, concurrency requirement or permits to achieve the highest and best use are not in place on January 1 of the assessment year. (Hughes) ...

HB 417 (Fernandez-Barquin) and SB 572 (Garcia) revise factors that a property appraiser must consider in deriving just valuation for a property. For example, the property appraiser may not consider the highest and best use if the necessary zoning changes, concurrency requirement or permits to achieve the highest and best use are not in place on January 1 of the assessment year. (Hughes)

Property Tax Discounts (Oppose)

HB 839 (Fischer) and SB 1152 (Rodriguez, A.) increase the property tax discount percentage rates for early payment of all property taxes assessed on the county tax rolls. (Hughes)  ...

HB 839 (Fischer) and SB 1152 (Rodriguez, A.) increase the property tax discount percentage rates for early payment of all property taxes assessed on the county tax rolls. (Hughes)

Property Tax Exemptions (Watch)

HB 13 (Gottlieb) and SB 154 (Rodriguez) increase the property tax exemption from $500 to $5,000 for homesteaded residents who are widows, widowers, blind or totally and permanently disabled. (Hughes) ...

HB 13 (Gottlieb) and SB 154 (Rodriguez) increase the property tax exemption from $500 to $5,000 for homesteaded residents who are widows, widowers, blind or totally and permanently disabled. (Hughes)

Property Tax Exemption for Affordable Housing (Support)

CS/SB 1150 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 495 (Rodriguez, Ant.) authorize municipalities and counties to adopt ordinances to grant ad valorem tax exemptions to property owners whose properties are used for governmental or public purpose of providing affordable housing. CS/SB 1150 now specifies that property given tax exemptions are considered having a charitable purpose.  (Hughes) ...

CS/SB 1150 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 495 (Rodriguez, Ant.) authorize municipalities and counties to adopt ordinances to grant ad valorem tax exemptions to property owners whose properties are used for governmental or public purpose of providing affordable housing. CS/SB 1150 now specifies that property given tax exemptions are considered having a charitable purpose.  (Hughes)

Property Taxation of Construction Equipment (Watch)

HB 751 (Clemons) revises the definition of the term "inventory" to include construction equipment by a heavy equipment rental dealer for sale or short-term rental in the normal course of business on the annual assessment date. This change only applies to non-school levies. (Hughes)  ...

HB 751 (Clemons) revises the definition of the term "inventory" to include construction equipment by a heavy equipment rental dealer for sale or short-term rental in the normal course of business on the annual assessment date. This change only applies to non-school levies. (Hughes)

Property Tax Exemption for Educational Properties (Watch)

HB 243 (Roth) and SB 1126 (Harrell) exempt, from property taxation, property used by educational institutions that hold a leasehold interest in certain leases that exceed 98 years. (Hughes)  ...

HB 243 (Roth) and SB 1126 (Harrell) exempt, from property taxation, property used by educational institutions that hold a leasehold interest in certain leases that exceed 98 years. (Hughes)

Public Deposits (Support)

SB 1318 (Hutson) and HB 1559 (Harding) allow the state's Chief Financial Officer to designate credit unions as qualified public depositories after meeting certain criteria. (Hughes) ...

SB 1318 (Hutson) and HB 1559 (Harding) allow the state's Chief Financial Officer to designate credit unions as qualified public depositories after meeting certain criteria. (Hughes)

Rental of Homestead Property (Oppose)

SB 1056 (Hutson) and HB 1345 (McFarland) revise the criteria of the homestead property tax exemption to state that the rental of a portion of a dwelling claimed to be a homestead while the dwelling is physically occupied by the owner does not constitute the abandonment of the dwelling as a homestead. (Hughes) ...

SB 1056 (Hutson) and HB 1345 (McFarland) revise the criteria of the homestead property tax exemption to state that the rental of a portion of a dwelling claimed to be a homestead while the dwelling is physically occupied by the owner does not constitute the abandonment of the dwelling as a homestead. (Hughes)

Tax on Rental of Real Property (Oppose)

HB 6093 (Gregory) and SB 1558 (Gruters) repeal Section 212.031, Florida Statutes, which subjects the renting, leasing, letting or granting a license for the use of any real property to sales and use tax. (Hughes)  ...

HB 6093 (Gregory) and SB 1558 (Gruters) repeal Section 212.031, Florida Statutes, which subjects the renting, leasing, letting or granting a license for the use of any real property to sales and use tax. (Hughes)

Taxation of Property Used for Agriculture (Watch)

HB 149 (Tuck) and SB 404 (Rodriguez) specify the methodology for the assessment of the structures and equipment used in aquaculture. The bills allow the property owner to request removal of its agriculture classification if the tax assessed based on such methodology exceeds the tax assessed based on the value of the structures and equipment. (Hughes) ...

HB 149 (Tuck) and SB 404 (Rodriguez) specify the methodology for the assessment of the structures and equipment used in aquaculture. The bills allow the property owner to request removal of its agriculture classification if the tax assessed based on such methodology exceeds the tax assessed based on the value of the structures and equipment. (Hughes)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 85 (Eskamani) and SB 246 (Book) – Tax Exemption for Diapers and Incontinence Products ...

HB 85 (Eskamani) and SB 246 (Book) – Tax Exemption for Diapers and Incontinence Products HB 201 (Daley) and SB 356 (Jones) – Sales Tax Holiday for ENERGY STAR & WaterSense Products SB 234 (Jones) and HB 613 (Robinson, F.) – Working Floridians Tax Rebate Program HB 439 (Smith, C.) and SB 712 (Taddeo) – Small Business Saturday Sales Tax Holiday  SB 500 (Perry) – Back-to-school Sales Tax Holiday HB 509 (Yarborough) and SB 830 (Hooper) – Sales Tax on Mobile Homes HB 589 (Harding) and SB 930 (Hooper) – Sales Tax Exemptions for Public Works HB 673 (Shoaf) SB 1542 (Gainer) – Tourist development Taxes HB 763 (Casello) and SB 1146 (Rodriguez) – Tax Exemption for Charges for Private Investigations SB 808 (Gruters) – Sales Tax Holiday for Disaster Preparedness Supplies HB 863 (DiCeglie) and SB 1250 (Gruters) – Sales Tax Refunds for Building Mitigation Retrofit Improvements SB 952 (Gruters) and HB 1293 (Gregory) – Taxation  CS/HB 959 (LaMarca) and SB 1874 (Boyd) – Department of Financial Services SB 1130 (Brodeur) and HB 1375 (Goff-Marcil) – Tax Collector Budgets SB 1132 (Gruters) and HB 801 (Fine) – Valuation of Timeshare Real Property HB 1163 (Overdorf) – Sales Tax Exemptions for Hydrogen Products SB 1256 (Gruters) and HB 977 (Caruso) – Sales of Tax Certificates SB 1382 (Gruters) and HB 1041 (Stevenson) – Tax Administration HB 1387 (Gregory) and SB 1840 (Gruters) – Determinations for Tax Exemptions SB 1470 (Stewart) – Taxation of Fees for the Use of Real Property SB 1610 (Rodriguez) – Ad Valorem Tax Abatement SB 1698 (Farmer) – Taxes/Marijuana  SB 1886 (Powell) – Taxes and Fees HB 6051 (Overdorf) and SB 786 (Hutson) – Aircraft Sales and Lease Tax HB 6075 (Eskamani) and SB 1898 (Farmer) – Tourist Development Taxes

GENERAL GOVERNMENT

Business Damages Against Local Government (Oppose)

SB 620 (Hutson) and CS/HB 569 (McClure) require compensation for business damages caused by local government ordinances or charter provisions. A business that has been engaged in a lawful business in Florida for at least three years may claim business damages from a local government if the government enacts or amends an ordinance or charter provision that will cause a reduction of at least 15% of the business’ profit as applied on a per-location basis of a business operating within the jurisdiction. A local government is not liable for business damages caused by: ordinances required to comply with ...

SB 620 (Hutson) and CS/HB 569 (McClure) require compensation for business damages caused by local government ordinances or charter provisions. A business that has been engaged in a lawful business in Florida for at least three years may claim business damages from a local government if the government enacts or amends an ordinance or charter provision that will cause a reduction of at least 15% of the business’ profit as applied on a per-location basis of a business operating within the jurisdiction. A local government is not liable for business damages caused by: ordinances required to comply with state or federal law; emergency ordinances, declarations or orders adopted pursuant to the state Emergency Management Act; a temporary emergency ordinance which remains in effect for no more than 90 days; ordinances or charter provisions enacted to implement: Part II of Chapter 163; Section 553.73; Section 633.202; a contract or an agreement, including contracts or agreements relating to grants or other financial assistance; debt issuance or refinancing; budgets or budget amendments. The bills specify procedures and methodologies for a business to recover business damages, attorney fees and costs against a local government. The bills’ provisions on attorney fee calculation and award are nearly identical to the business damage procedures set forth in Florida’s eminent domain statute. (O’Hara)

Local Ordinances (Support)

CS/CS/SB 280 (Hutson) and HB 403 (Giallombardo) impose new substantive requirements on municipalities for adopting and enforcing ordinances. First, the bills require a municipality to prepare a business impact estimate before adopting an ordinance and specifies the minimum content that must be included in the statement. The bills various ordinances from this requirement. The estimate must be posted on the municipality’s website no later than the date of publication of notice of the proposed ordinance. Second, the bills require a municipality to suspend enforcement of an ordinance that is the subject of a civil action challenging the ordinance’s ...

CS/CS/SB 280 (Hutson) and HB 403 (Giallombardo) impose new substantive requirements on municipalities for adopting and enforcing ordinances. First, the bills require a municipality to prepare a business impact estimate before adopting an ordinance and specifies the minimum content that must be included in the statement. The bills various ordinances from this requirement. The estimate must be posted on the municipality’s website no later than the date of publication of notice of the proposed ordinance. Second, the bills require a municipality to suspend enforcement of an ordinance that is the subject of a civil action challenging the ordinance’s validity on grounds that it is arbitrary or unreasonable or expressly preempted by state law. This requirement applies only if: the action was filed within 90 days of the ordinance’s effective date; suspension of the ordinance was requested in the complaint; and the municipality was served with a copy of the complaint. If the municipality prevails in the civil action and an appeal is taken, the bills authorize the court to consider continuing or lifting the stay of enforcement of the ordinance. Third, the bills authorize the award of attorney fees, costs and damages to a prevailing plaintiff in a civil action commenced after October 1, 2022, in which an ordinance is alleged to be arbitrary or unreasonable. The bills require courts to prioritize and expedite the disposition of cases in which enforcement of an ordinance is suspended. The bills exempt various ordinances from the stay of enforcement provision. (O’Hara)

Preemption to the State (Support)

HB 6113 (Eskamani) and SB 1900 (Torres) repeal numerous provisions of current law that operate as preemptions of municipal and county authority on a variety of subjects. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6113 (Eskamani) and SB 1900 (Torres) repeal numerous provisions of current law that operate as preemptions of municipal and county authority on a variety of subjects. (O'Hara)

Supermajority Vote for Legislative Preemption (Support)

SB 152 (Farmer) proposes an amendment to the Florida Constitution that would require any general law that preempts a subject of legislation to the state to pass by a two-thirds vote of each house of the legislature. (O'Hara) ...

SB 152 (Farmer) proposes an amendment to the Florida Constitution that would require any general law that preempts a subject of legislation to the state to pass by a two-thirds vote of each house of the legislature. (O'Hara)

HOUSING

Mixed-use Residential Development Projects for Affordable Housing (Support)

SB 962 (Bradley) and HB 981 (Payne) allow a municipality or county regardless of zoning or a comprehensive plan to approve mixed-use residential development projects if the portion of the project is used for affordable housing. (Branch) ...

SB 962 (Bradley) and HB 981 (Payne) allow a municipality or county regardless of zoning or a comprehensive plan to approve mixed-use residential development projects if the portion of the project is used for affordable housing. (Branch)

Private Property Rights to Prune, Trim and Remove Trees (Support)

CS/SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and increase the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. As amended, CS/SB 518 defines residential property as a single-family detached building located on an existing lot, actively used for single-family residential purposes, and which is either an existing conforming use or a legally recognized nonconforming use following the local jurisdiction's ...

CS/SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and increase the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. As amended, CS/SB 518 defines residential property as a single-family detached building located on an existing lot, actively used for single-family residential purposes, and which is either an existing conforming use or a legally recognized nonconforming use following the local jurisdiction's applicable land development regulations. (Branch)

State Housing Assistance Programs (Oppose)

SB 1170 (Brandes) and HB 1553 (Plakon) create a State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Block Grant Program. Instead of entitlement municipalities receiving direct SHIP funding, the bills would distribute all the monies to counties. A county would not be required to share any of the funding with any of the municipalities within their boundaries. (Branch) ...

SB 1170 (Brandes) and HB 1553 (Plakon) create a State Housing Initiatives Partnership (SHIP) Block Grant Program. Instead of entitlement municipalities receiving direct SHIP funding, the bills would distribute all the monies to counties. A county would not be required to share any of the funding with any of the municipalities within their boundaries. (Branch)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 1089 (Woodson) and SB 1924 (Rodriguez, A.) – Affordable Housing ...

HB 1089 (Woodson) and SB 1924 (Rodriguez, A.) – Affordable Housing HB 6017 (Eskamani)and SB 580 (Torres) – Rent Control Measures

LAND USE & COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING

Floating Solar Facilities (Oppose) 

SB 1338 (Diaz) and HB 1411 (Avila) provide that a floating solar facility must be a permitted use in appropriate land use categories in each local government's comprehensive plan. The bills require each local government to amend its development regulations to promote the expanded use of floating solar facilities. (Cruz) ...

SB 1338 (Diaz) and HB 1411 (Avila) provide that a floating solar facility must be a permitted use in appropriate land use categories in each local government's comprehensive plan. The bills require each local government to amend its development regulations to promote the expanded use of floating solar facilities. (Cruz)

Impact Fee Credits (Watch) 

HB 681 (Rodriguez) and SB 1030 (Taddeo) clarify that impact fee credits are assignable and transferable any time after establishment from one development or parcel to any other as long as it falls within the same impact fee zone or district, or that is within the same impact fee zone in the county or municipality. (Cruz) ...

HB 681 (Rodriguez) and SB 1030 (Taddeo) clarify that impact fee credits are assignable and transferable any time after establishment from one development or parcel to any other as long as it falls within the same impact fee zone or district, or that is within the same impact fee zone in the county or municipality. (Cruz)

Local Government Land Development Actions (Oppose) 

HB 739 (Borrero) and SB 1248 (Gruters) specify that a county or municipality must review applications for development permits or orders within 30 days of receiving the application and issue a letter indicating that all required information is submitted or specifying any areas that are deficient. In an attempt to make a more uniform process for future developments, the bills also require that each local government adopt residential infill development standards in its land use regulations by October 1, 2022. The legislation requires local governments to adopt certain guidelines when adopting its residential infill development standards that may ...

HB 739 (Borrero) and SB 1248 (Gruters) specify that a county or municipality must review applications for development permits or orders within 30 days of receiving the application and issue a letter indicating that all required information is submitted or specifying any areas that are deficient. In an attempt to make a more uniform process for future developments, the bills also require that each local government adopt residential infill development standards in its land use regulations by October 1, 2022. The legislation requires local governments to adopt certain guidelines when adopting its residential infill development standards that may preempt existing land use regulations. (Cruz)

Marketable Record Titles to Real Property (Watch) 

HB 219 (Tuck) and SB 1380 (Rodriguez, A.) revise that rights that are not affected or extinguished by Marketable Record Titles Act (MRTA) and require persons with certain interests in land that may be extinguished by this act to file a specified notice to preserve their interests. The bills establish a bright-line rule to clarify MRTA's operation in light of the 2016 court decision and clarify that a property conveyance subject to existing encumbrances identified in a muniment of title does not restart MRTA's 30-year marketability period on such encumbrances. The bills add covenants, restrictions, zoning requirements, and ...

HB 219 (Tuck) and SB 1380 (Rodriguez, A.) revise that rights that are not affected or extinguished by Marketable Record Titles Act (MRTA) and require persons with certain interests in land that may be extinguished by this act to file a specified notice to preserve their interests. The bills establish a bright-line rule to clarify MRTA's operation in light of the 2016 court decision and clarify that a property conveyance subject to existing encumbrances identified in a muniment of title does not restart MRTA's 30-year marketability period on such encumbrances. The bills add covenants, restrictions, zoning requirements, and building or development permits to the list of encumbrances extinguished by MRTA but excepts them from extinguishment. Additionally, the bills authorize owners or operators of private property used for motor vehicle parking to establish rules, rates and fines governing private persons parking on the property. The bills prohibit counties and municipalities from enacting any ordinance or regulation attempting to restrict or prohibit the owner or operator from adopting such rules, rates or fines. (Cruz)

Mobility Funding System (Watch)

SB 1824 (Brodeur) and HB 1415 (Robinson, W.) revise the requirements and best practices for local governments applying mobility plans rather than impact fees. The bills require a local government adopting a mobility plan to evaluate appropriate levels of service and potential impacts of development by using the elements of its comprehensive plan. Local governments that adopt mobility plans must adopt the mobility plan and a mobility fee system into its comprehensive plan. (Cruz) ...

SB 1824 (Brodeur) and HB 1415 (Robinson, W.) revise the requirements and best practices for local governments applying mobility plans rather than impact fees. The bills require a local government adopting a mobility plan to evaluate appropriate levels of service and potential impacts of development by using the elements of its comprehensive plan. Local governments that adopt mobility plans must adopt the mobility plan and a mobility fee system into its comprehensive plan. (Cruz)

School Concurrency (Watch) 

SB 706 (Perry) requires instead of encourages local governments that adopt school concurrency to apply such concurrency to development on a districtwide basis so that a concurrency determination for a specific development will be based upon the availability of school capacity districtwide. The bill specif that proportionate-share mitigation must be set aside and not spent if an improvement has not been identified. The House companion bill, CS/HB 851 (McClain), was substantially amended in committee and removed the requirement that school concurreny be determined on a districtwide basis. The bill now requires developers to tender, rather than execute, a ...

SB 706 (Perry) requires instead of encourages local governments that adopt school concurrency to apply such concurrency to development on a districtwide basis so that a concurrency determination for a specific development will be based upon the availability of school capacity districtwide. The bill specif that proportionate-share mitigation must be set aside and not spent if an improvement has not been identified. The House companion bill, CS/HB 851 (McClain), was substantially amended in committee and removed the requirement that school concurreny be determined on a districtwide basis. The bill now requires developers to tender, rather than execute, a written, legally binding commitment to provide proportionate-share mitigation. The bill further requires the local government to issue a final decision on the developer’s tendered commitment within 60 days from the date of receipt. If the local government fails to issue a final decision within 60 days, the tendered commitment will be deemed approved. Lastly, the bill requires a school board to set aside and not spend any proportionate-share mitigation if there is no school capacity improvement identified in the five-year school board educational facilities plan until such time as such an improvement has been identified. (Cruz)

OTHER

Acceptance of Cash Payments by Businesses (Watch)

HB 233 (Willhite) and SB 408 (Jones) require businesses to accept cash payments for any good or service if the customer is physically present at the place of business. The bills exempt transactions above $5,000. Of interest to local governments, the bills exempt parking facilities owned by a municipality regardless of who operates the parking facility. (Taggart) ...

HB 233 (Willhite) and SB 408 (Jones) require businesses to accept cash payments for any good or service if the customer is physically present at the place of business. The bills exempt transactions above $5,000. Of interest to local governments, the bills exempt parking facilities owned by a municipality regardless of who operates the parking facility. (Taggart)

Communicable and Infectious Diseases (Watch)

HB 117 (Fetterhoff) and SB 774 (Gruters) add COVID-19 and infectious diseases to the list of conditions that, if suffered by an emergency rescue or public safety worker, are presumed to have been contracted while at work for purposes of workers' compensation. Unlike similar presumptions in current law for hepatitis, meningococcal meningitis and tuberculosis, the bills do not require the public safety worker or emergency rescue worker to receive immunization against COVID-19 in order to receive the presumptive eligibility provisions afforded by workers' compensation coverage. (Cruz) ...

HB 117 (Fetterhoff) and SB 774 (Gruters) add COVID-19 and infectious diseases to the list of conditions that, if suffered by an emergency rescue or public safety worker, are presumed to have been contracted while at work for purposes of workers' compensation. Unlike similar presumptions in current law for hepatitis, meningococcal meningitis and tuberculosis, the bills do not require the public safety worker or emergency rescue worker to receive immunization against COVID-19 in order to receive the presumptive eligibility provisions afforded by workers' compensation coverage. (Cruz)

Criminal Justice (Support)

SB 450 (Jones) and HB 857 (Nixon) repeal multiple provisions from HB 1, which passed in the 2021 Legislative Session, including allowing specified elected officials to appeal a municipal law enforcement operating budget that contains a funding reduction. (Hughes) ...

SB 450 (Jones) and HB 857 (Nixon) repeal multiple provisions from HB 1, which passed in the 2021 Legislative Session, including allowing specified elected officials to appeal a municipal law enforcement operating budget that contains a funding reduction. (Hughes)

Emergency Orders Prohibiting Religious Services or Activities (Watch)

CS/HB 215 (DiCeglie) and CS/SB 254 (Brodeur) provide that an emergency order may not expressly prohibit a religious institution from regular religious services or activities. (Branch) ...

CS/HB 215 (DiCeglie) and CS/SB 254 (Brodeur) provide that an emergency order may not expressly prohibit a religious institution from regular religious services or activities. (Branch)

Emergency Preparedness and Response (Watch)

SB 98 (Burgess) and HB 7023 (Pandemics & Public Emergencies Committee, Trabulsy) create the Emergency Preparedness and Response Fund within the Executive Office of the Governor. CS/SB 96 (Burgess) and HB 7025 (Pandemics & Public Emergencies Committee, Trabulsy) authorize the Legislative Budget Commission (LBC) to convene to transfer or appropriate funds to the Emergency Preparedness Response Fund. Under the bills, after approval from the LBC, the Governor could transfer, expend and request additional moneys into the fund. (Branch) ...

SB 98 (Burgess) and HB 7023 (Pandemics & Public Emergencies Committee, Trabulsy) create the Emergency Preparedness and Response Fund within the Executive Office of the Governor. CS/SB 96 (Burgess) and HB 7025 (Pandemics & Public Emergencies Committee, Trabulsy) authorize the Legislative Budget Commission (LBC) to convene to transfer or appropriate funds to the Emergency Preparedness Response Fund. Under the bills, after approval from the LBC, the Governor could transfer, expend and request additional moneys into the fund. (Branch)

First Responder's Employment-related Accidents and Injuries (Watch)

HB 49 (Bartleman) and SB 200 (Rodriguez) expand the eligibility for first responder post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) workers' compensation benefits to also include certain correctional officers, 911 public safety telecommunicators, and all volunteer law enforcement officers and firefighters. Current law only covers law enforcement officers and firefighters. The bills require the employing agency to provide at least one hour of educational training related to mental health awareness, prevention, mitigation and treatment annually. (Cruz) ...

HB 49 (Bartleman) and SB 200 (Rodriguez) expand the eligibility for first responder post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) workers' compensation benefits to also include certain correctional officers, 911 public safety telecommunicators, and all volunteer law enforcement officers and firefighters. Current law only covers law enforcement officers and firefighters. The bills require the employing agency to provide at least one hour of educational training related to mental health awareness, prevention, mitigation and treatment annually. (Cruz)

Home Kitchen Operations (Oppose)

HB 707 (Learned) and SB 1158 (Jones) define "home kitchen operations" as a person or business entity that sells directly from their home to the consumer any food product (excluding raw milk and raw oysters). The bills exempt these operations from the requirements imposed on traditional public food service establishments. Additionally, the bills specify that local governments are preempted from directly regulating these operations; however, they must comply with any applicable home-based business regulations. A home kitchen operation cannot exceed annual gross sales of $250,000. (Taggart) ...

HB 707 (Learned) and SB 1158 (Jones) define "home kitchen operations" as a person or business entity that sells directly from their home to the consumer any food product (excluding raw milk and raw oysters). The bills exempt these operations from the requirements imposed on traditional public food service establishments. Additionally, the bills specify that local governments are preempted from directly regulating these operations; however, they must comply with any applicable home-based business regulations. A home kitchen operation cannot exceed annual gross sales of $250,000. (Taggart)

Immigration Enforcement (Watch)

HB 1355 (Snyder) and SB 1808 (Bean) revise the definition of "sanctuary policy" to include specified laws, policies, practices, procedures or customs which limit or prohibit law enforcement agencies from providing immigration information to a state entity. The bills require law enforcement agencies operating county detention facilities to enter into an agreement with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and would require such agency to report specified information concerning such agreement quarterly to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. (Cruz) ...

HB 1355 (Snyder) and SB 1808 (Bean) revise the definition of "sanctuary policy" to include specified laws, policies, practices, procedures or customs which limit or prohibit law enforcement agencies from providing immigration information to a state entity. The bills require law enforcement agencies operating county detention facilities to enter into an agreement with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and would require such agency to report specified information concerning such agreement quarterly to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. (Cruz)

Incorporation of Municipalities (Oppose)

CS/HB 1035 (Williamson) and SB 1554 (Diaz) require communities to reach a 60% approval in a local nonbinding referendum before presenting an incorporation bill to the state Legislature. This referendum requirement would be in addition to the already required feasibility study and city charter. The bills require that the feasibility study be presented to the Legislature no later than August 31 of the year before the regular session of the Legislature during which the municipal charter would be enacted. (Branch)  ...

CS/HB 1035 (Williamson) and SB 1554 (Diaz) require communities to reach a 60% approval in a local nonbinding referendum before presenting an incorporation bill to the state Legislature. This referendum requirement would be in addition to the already required feasibility study and city charter. The bills require that the feasibility study be presented to the Legislature no later than August 31 of the year before the regular session of the Legislature during which the municipal charter would be enacted. (Branch)

Local Districting (Watch)

SB 1142 (Hutson) and HB 827 (Barnaby) prohibit the drawings of districts from favoring or disfavoring an incumbent county commissioner, municipal official or school board member. The bills require municipalities to fix the boundaries of their districts in only odd-numbered years to keep them as nearly equal in proportion to the population as possible. (Branch) ...

SB 1142 (Hutson) and HB 827 (Barnaby) prohibit the drawings of districts from favoring or disfavoring an incumbent county commissioner, municipal official or school board member. The bills require municipalities to fix the boundaries of their districts in only odd-numbered years to keep them as nearly equal in proportion to the population as possible. (Branch)

Pet Protection (Oppose)

CS/SB 994 (Diaz) and HB 849 (Fernandez-Barquin) create a statewide regulatory scheme for the licensure, regulation and inspection of retail pet stores by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. The bills specify that local governments may adopt ordinances that regulate but do not prohibit the operation of retail pet stores or the breeding, purchase, or sale of household pets, provided that the ordinance is not in conflict with the statewide regulations specified in the bills. The bills clarify that ordinances adopted prior to June 1, 2021, are "grandfathered" in addition to ordinances adopted prior to June 1, ...

CS/SB 994 (Diaz) and HB 849 (Fernandez-Barquin) create a statewide regulatory scheme for the licensure, regulation and inspection of retail pet stores by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. The bills specify that local governments may adopt ordinances that regulate but do not prohibit the operation of retail pet stores or the breeding, purchase, or sale of household pets, provided that the ordinance is not in conflict with the statewide regulations specified in the bills. The bills clarify that ordinances adopted prior to June 1, 2021, are "grandfathered" in addition to ordinances adopted prior to June 1, 2022, which impose a moratorium on new pet stores or are solely regulatory in nature. Additionally, the bills impose new requirements on animal shelters, including disclosing bite history prior to the animal's adoption and a prohibition on intentional breeding of animals for sale. The bills also preempt local governments from regulating a person who offers for sale, directly to the public, certain types of dogs for sporting or agricultural purposes.  CS/SB 996 (Diaz) sets the initial and renewal fee for a retail pet store license by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation at $25 per licensed location. (Taggart)

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Workers' Compensation for Law Enforcement, Correctional and Correctional Probation Officers (Watch)

HB 425 (Fischer) and SB 664 (Bradley) expand workers' compensation coverage for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for first responders to also include correctional officers, part-time correctional officers, part-time law enforcement officers and auxiliary law enforcement officers. PTSD is an occupational disease compensable by workers' compensation benefits. In order to receive benefits under this bill, post-traumatic stress disorder must be demonstrated by clear and convincing medical evidence. (Cruz) ...

HB 425 (Fischer) and SB 664 (Bradley) expand workers' compensation coverage for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) for first responders to also include correctional officers, part-time correctional officers, part-time law enforcement officers and auxiliary law enforcement officers. PTSD is an occupational disease compensable by workers' compensation benefits. In order to receive benefits under this bill, post-traumatic stress disorder must be demonstrated by clear and convincing medical evidence. (Cruz)

Preemption of the Regulation of Tobacco and Nicotine Products (Support)

SB 1022 (Ausley) and HB 6081 (Hunschofsky) repeal the state preemption on the regulation of tobacco and nicotine products. Current law preempts local governments from regulating the marketing, sale or delivery of tobacco products. (Taggart)  ...

SB 1022 (Ausley) and HB 6081 (Hunschofsky) repeal the state preemption on the regulation of tobacco and nicotine products. Current law preempts local governments from regulating the marketing, sale or delivery of tobacco products. (Taggart)

Retail Sale of Domestic Dogs and Cats (Watch)

HB 253 (Killebrew) prohibits a for-profit business from selling domestic cats and dogs. The bill does not prohibit a city or county from adopting an ordinance on the sale of animals that is more stringent than the bill. (Taggart) ...

HB 253 (Killebrew) prohibits a for-profit business from selling domestic cats and dogs. The bill does not prohibit a city or county from adopting an ordinance on the sale of animals that is more stringent than the bill. (Taggart)

Tethering of Domestic Dogs and Cats (Watch)

HB 1075 (Slosberg-King) and SB 1508 (Taddeo) create the "Penny Bautista Act." The bills prohibit a person from tethering a domestic dog or domestic cat unless the person is physically present with and attending to the dog or cat and the dog or cat remains visible to the person at all times while tethered. (Taggart) ...

HB 1075 (Slosberg-King) and SB 1508 (Taddeo) create the "Penny Bautista Act." The bills prohibit a person from tethering a domestic dog or domestic cat unless the person is physically present with and attending to the dog or cat and the dog or cat remains visible to the person at all times while tethered. (Taggart)

Workers' Compensation Benefits for First Responders (Watch)

HB 689 (Giallombardo) and SB 1066 (Burgess) specify that the time for notice of an injury or death in a compensable post-traumatic stress disorder claim must be properly noticed within 52 weeks after the qualifying event or the diagnosis of the disorder, whichever is later. (Cruz) ...

HB 689 (Giallombardo) and SB 1066 (Burgess) specify that the time for notice of an injury or death in a compensable post-traumatic stress disorder claim must be properly noticed within 52 weeks after the qualifying event or the diagnosis of the disorder, whichever is later. (Cruz)

Other Bills of Interest

SB 262 (Rodriguez) and HB 6011 (Roach) – Damages Recoverable by Parents of an Adult Child in Medical Negligence Actions ...

SB 262 (Rodriguez) and HB 6011 (Roach) – Damages Recoverable by Parents of an Adult Child in Medical Negligence Actions HB 295 (Fernandez-Barquin) – Workers' Compensation Coverage by Employee Leasing Companies HB 335 (Fabricio)  HB 353 (Fabricio)– Satisfaction of Mortgages HB 383 and HB 385 (Maney) – Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsels HB 431 (Barnaby) and SB 1680 (Gruters) – Office of Financial Regulation HB 465 (Sirois) and SB 438 (Burgess) – Unites States Armed Forces HB 471 (Roth) – Town of Lake Clarke Shores, Palm Beach County SB 468 (Perry) and HB 503 (Gregory) – Insurance  SB 560 (Rodriguez) and HB 6039 (Hinson)– Recovery for Wrongful Death SB 596 and SB 598 (Baxley) – Criminal Conflict and Civil Regional Counsels SB 610 (Brandes) and SB 7014 (Judiciary)– COVID-19 Related Claims Against Health Care Providers HB 695 (Stevenson) and SB 1058 (Hutson) – Property Insurer Reimbursements HB 829 (Bryd) and SB 1342 (Diaz) – Civil Actions for Deprivation of Rights, Privileges, or Immunities HB 1123 (Maney) and SB 1274 (Broxson) – Ratification of Rules of the Department of Financial Services HB 1185 (Plakon) and SB 1276 (Diaz) – Legislative Review of Proposed Regulation on Unregulated Functions SB 1548 (Perry) – Occupational Licensing  HB 7013 (Fabricio) and SB 7018 (Banking & Insurance) – OGSR/Workers' Compensation/Department of Financial Services HB 2239 (Smith, D.) – UCF-Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Clinic for Florida Veterans and First Responders HB 429 (Goff-Marcil) and SB 532 (Stewart) – Private Schools HB 619 (Rodriguez) and SB 1336 (Boyd) – United States-produced Iron and Steel in Public Works Projects HB 631 (Grall) and SB 780 (Hutson) – Airports   HB 719 (Smith) and SB 1044 (Hooper) – Swim-up Bars SB 812 (Baxley) and HB 815 (Killebrew) – Digital License Plate Pilot Program HB 894 (Farmer) – Strategic Fuel Reserve Plan SB 1524 (Boyd) – Recreation Districts SB 178 (Pizzo) and HB 285 (Benjamin) – Visiting County and Municipal Detention Facilities SB 162, SB 164, & SB 326 (Brandes), HB 333 (Williamson) and HB 1585 (Williams)– Physicians Certifications for the Medical Use of Marijuana HB 467 (Hinson), HB 549 (Omphroy), HB 551 (Omphroy), SB 776 (Brandes) and SB 1884 (Powell)  – Legalization of Recreational Marijuana SB 556 (Cruz) – Medical Marijuana Identification Cards for Service-disabled Veterans HB 575 (McClain) and SB 1216 (Hutson) – Vacation and Timeshare Plans HB 679 (Learned) and SB 1268 (Gruters) – Cannabis Regulation HB 693 (Drake) and SB 768 (Rodriguez) – Department of Health SB 704 (Harrell) and HB 479 (Caruso) – Substance Abuse Service Providers SB 714 (Hooper) and HB 667 (McClain) – Department of Business and Professional Regulation SB 944 (Baxley) and HB 1227 (Toledo) – Online Marketplace Transparency   SB 990 (Diaz) and HB 867 (Rizo) – Towing Vehicles HB 1061 (Chaney) and SB 1750 (Wright)  – Sale of Cats and Dogs SB 1144 (Brodeur) – Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity HB 1471 (Smith) – Availability of Marijuana for Adult Use SB 1624 and SB 1696 (Farmer) – Fees/Marijuana Establishments SB 1906 (Rouson) – Hemp Extract Products

PERSONNEL

Financial Disclosures for Elected Local Officers (Oppose)

CS/CS/HB 301 (Roach) and CS/SB 510 (Brodeur) require all municipal elected officials and all municipal managers to file an annual full disclosure of financial interests (Form 6) with the Florida Commission on Ethics. These individuals are currently required to file only a Limited Disclosure of Financial Interests (Form 1). (Hughes) ...

CS/CS/HB 301 (Roach) and CS/SB 510 (Brodeur) require all municipal elected officials and all municipal managers to file an annual full disclosure of financial interests (Form 6) with the Florida Commission on Ethics. These individuals are currently required to file only a Limited Disclosure of Financial Interests (Form 1). (Hughes)

Fire Investigator Cancer Treatment Benefits (Watch)

HB 557 (Salzman) and SB 838 (Wright) expand the eligibility for certain cancer treatment benefits to include full-time, Florida-certified fire investigators. (Hughes) ...

HB 557 (Salzman) and SB 838 (Wright) expand the eligibility for certain cancer treatment benefits to include full-time, Florida-certified fire investigators. (Hughes)

Firefighter Inquiries and Investigations (Watch)

SB 264 (Hooper) and HB 31 (Busatta Cabrera) extend certain provisions of the Firefighters' Bill of Rights to questioning conducted under an informal inquiry. The bills specify that an informal inquiry does not include routine work-related discussions, such as safety sessions or normal operational fire debriefings. The bills require an informal inquiry of a firefighter to be of reasonable duration with permitted periods for rest and personnel necessities and not subject the firefighter to offensive language or offer any incentive as an inducement to answer any questions. During an informal inquiry or interrogation, a firefighter may not be ...

SB 264 (Hooper) and HB 31 (Busatta Cabrera) extend certain provisions of the Firefighters' Bill of Rights to questioning conducted under an informal inquiry. The bills specify that an informal inquiry does not include routine work-related discussions, such as safety sessions or normal operational fire debriefings. The bills require an informal inquiry of a firefighter to be of reasonable duration with permitted periods for rest and personnel necessities and not subject the firefighter to offensive language or offer any incentive as an inducement to answer any questions. During an informal inquiry or interrogation, a firefighter may not be threatened with a transfer, suspension, dismissal or other disciplinary action. (Hughes)

Individual Freedom (Watch)

HB 7 (Avila) makes subjecting any individual, as a condition of employment, to specific concepts constitutes discrimination based on race, sex, color, sex or national origin and is an unlawful employment practice. (Hughes) ...

HB 7 (Avila) makes subjecting any individual, as a condition of employment, to specific concepts constitutes discrimination based on race, sex, color, sex or national origin and is an unlawful employment practice. (Hughes)

Law Enforcement Death Benefits (Oppose)

HB 645 (Gottlieb) and SB 992 (Book) require employers of full-time law enforcement, corrections and corrections probation officers to extend employer-paid health insurance benefits to the officer's surviving spouse and each dependent child if the officer dies in the line of duty as a result of exposure to a pandemic disease that is the subject of a public health emergency. These bills apply retroactively to March 1, 2020. (Hughes) ...

HB 645 (Gottlieb) and SB 992 (Book) require employers of full-time law enforcement, corrections and corrections probation officers to extend employer-paid health insurance benefits to the officer's surviving spouse and each dependent child if the officer dies in the line of duty as a result of exposure to a pandemic disease that is the subject of a public health emergency. These bills apply retroactively to March 1, 2020. (Hughes)

Law Enforcement Officer, Benefits, Recruitment and Training (Support)

HB 3 (Leek) provides multiple new and expanded benefits and training for first responders. Of note to municipalities, the bill creates the Florida Law Enforcement Recruitment Bonus Payment Program within the Department of Economic Opportunity. The program is a one-time payment to newly employed officers within the state to aid in the recruitment of officers. Bonus payments are contingent upon legislative appropriations. (Hughes) ...

HB 3 (Leek) provides multiple new and expanded benefits and training for first responders. Of note to municipalities, the bill creates the Florida Law Enforcement Recruitment Bonus Payment Program within the Department of Economic Opportunity. The program is a one-time payment to newly employed officers within the state to aid in the recruitment of officers. Bonus payments are contingent upon legislative appropriations. (Hughes)

Law Enforcement Vehicles (Watch)

CS/HB 139 (Fabricio) requires an agency that employs law enforcement officers and allows those officers to operate an agency-owned vehicle outside the course and scope of the officer's employment or function to maintain current and valid motor vehicle insurance, including bodily injury, death and property damage liability coverage that covers the time an officer spends while going to or coming from work or any other agency assignment in an official law enforcement vehicle. (Hughes) ...

CS/HB 139 (Fabricio) requires an agency that employs law enforcement officers and allows those officers to operate an agency-owned vehicle outside the course and scope of the officer's employment or function to maintain current and valid motor vehicle insurance, including bodily injury, death and property damage liability coverage that covers the time an officer spends while going to or coming from work or any other agency assignment in an official law enforcement vehicle. (Hughes)

Preemption of Local Government Wage Mandates (Oppose)

SB 1124 (Gruters) and HB 943 (Harding) create the "Wage Mandate Preemption Act," which revise prohibitions relating to political subdivisions, including municipalities. The bills prohibit a political subdivision from enacting a wage mandate on an employer in an amount greater than the state minimum wage. The bills do not apply to employees of the political subdivision or if federal law requires the payment of a minimum wage to persons working on projects funded by federal funds. (Hughes) ...

SB 1124 (Gruters) and HB 943 (Harding) create the "Wage Mandate Preemption Act," which revise prohibitions relating to political subdivisions, including municipalities. The bills prohibit a political subdivision from enacting a wage mandate on an employer in an amount greater than the state minimum wage. The bills do not apply to employees of the political subdivision or if federal law requires the payment of a minimum wage to persons working on projects funded by federal funds. (Hughes)

Racial and Sexual Discrimination (Watch)

HB 57 (Fine) and SB 242 (Gruters) prohibit municipalities, and other governmental entities, from including in any mandatory employee training "divisive concepts" as defined by the bills. ...

HB 57 (Fine) and SB 242 (Gruters) prohibit municipalities, and other governmental entities, from including in any mandatory employee training "divisive concepts" as defined by the bills. The bills also require that each municipality ensure that all diversity and inclusion efforts encourage employees not to judge each other on color, race, ethnicity, sex or any other characteristic protected by federal or state law. (Hughes)

Service as a Law Enforcement Officer (Watch)

CS/SB 266 (Diaz) revises the definition of "law enforcement officer" to specify that time spent on certain activities, such as portal-portal travel in an agency-issued vehicle, is a part of service as a law enforcement officer. (Hughes) ...

CS/SB 266 (Diaz) revises the definition of "law enforcement officer" to specify that time spent on certain activities, such as portal-portal travel in an agency-issued vehicle, is a part of service as a law enforcement officer. (Hughes)

Wage and Employment Benefits (Support)

SB 446 (Taddeo) and HB 6047 (Smith, C.) repeal the preemption on political subdivisions' ability to establish a minimum wage other than the state or federal minimum wage. (Hughes) ...

SB 446 (Taddeo) and HB 6047 (Smith, C.) repeal the preemption on political subdivisions' ability to establish a minimum wage other than the state or federal minimum wage. (Hughes)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 293 (Thompson) and SB 322 (Stewart) – Discrimination in Labor and Employment  ...

HB 293 (Thompson) and SB 322 (Stewart) – Discrimination in Labor and Employment  SB 376 (Book) and HB 291 (Woodson) – Employment Protections SB 382 (Brandes) – Minimum Wage Training SB 550 (Cruz) and HB 853 (Daley) – Unlawful Employment Practices SB 720 (Ausley) – The Florida Retirement System  SB 688 (Cruz), SB 629 (Nixon) and HB 627 (Nixon) – Employment Practices for Family Medical Leave SB 656 (Cruz) and HB 629 (Nixon) – Family and Medical Leave Insurance Benefits Fund  HB 949 (Chambliss) – Employment Accommodations for Family or Household Members of Homicide Victims HB 1247 (Grieco) and SB 1606 (Polsky) – Medical Marijuana Public Employee Protection HB 1253 (Brown) and SB 1608 (Bracy) – Prhibited Discrimination Based on Hairstyle HB 1551 (Tomkow) – Florida Retirement System

PROCUREMENT

Acquisition of Professional Services (Support)

HB 6091 (Gregory) and SB 1520 (Gruters) remove a provision in the Consultants' Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA) that requires a municipality to consider an equitable distribution of contracts among all qualified firms during the competitive selection process. (Taggart)  ...

HB 6091 (Gregory) and SB 1520 (Gruters) remove a provision in the Consultants' Competitive Negotiation Act (CCNA) that requires a municipality to consider an equitable distribution of contracts among all qualified firms during the competitive selection process. (Taggart)

Energy (Watch) 

CS/SB 954 (Brodeur) and HB 1139 (Drake) revise the vehicle procurement requirements for the state purchasing plan. Specifically, the bills require vehicles of a given use class to be selected for procurement based on the lowest lifetime ownership costs rather than the greatest fuel efficiency. Before July 1, 2023, the Department of Management Services (DMS) shall make recommendations regarding the procurement of electric vehicles and best practices for integrating such vehicles into existing fleets. CS/SB 954 was amended to direct DMS to rank vehicles based on the lowest cost of ownership over five years. Any vehicle purchased under ...

CS/SB 954 (Brodeur) and HB 1139 (Drake) revise the vehicle procurement requirements for the state purchasing plan. Specifically, the bills require vehicles of a given use class to be selected for procurement based on the lowest lifetime ownership costs rather than the greatest fuel efficiency. Before July 1, 2023, the Department of Management Services (DMS) shall make recommendations regarding the procurement of electric vehicles and best practices for integrating such vehicles into existing fleets. CS/SB 954 was amended to direct DMS to rank vehicles based on the lowest cost of ownership over five years. Any vehicle purchased under the state's purchasing plan must be ranked in the top five of the department's rankings. Law enforcement vehicles are exempt from this requirement. (Taggart)

Evidence of Vendor Financial Stability (Watch)

HB 1057 (Andrade) and SB 1952 (Albritton) state that agencies who require vendors to demonstrate financial stability during the competitive solicitation process must accept any of the following as evidence of such stability: audited financial statements, documentation of an investment-grade rating from a credit rating agency, or for vendors with annual revenues exceeding $1 billion, a letter issued by the chief financial officer or controller of that vendor. (Taggart) ...

HB 1057 (Andrade) and SB 1952 (Albritton) state that agencies who require vendors to demonstrate financial stability during the competitive solicitation process must accept any of the following as evidence of such stability: audited financial statements, documentation of an investment-grade rating from a credit rating agency, or for vendors with annual revenues exceeding $1 billion, a letter issued by the chief financial officer or controller of that vendor. (Taggart)

PUBLIC RECORDS & PUBLIC MEETINGS

OGSR/Campus Emergency Response (Support)

SB 7006 (Education) saves from repeal the public records exemption relating to any portion of a campus emergency response held by a public postsecondary institution, a state or local law enforcement agency, a county or municipal emergency management agency, the Executive Office of the Governor, the Department of Education, the Board of Governors of the State University System, or the Division of Emergency Management, as well as that portion of a public meeting which would reveal information related to a campus emergency response. (Taggart) ...

SB 7006 (Education) saves from repeal the public records exemption relating to any portion of a campus emergency response held by a public postsecondary institution, a state or local law enforcement agency, a county or municipal emergency management agency, the Executive Office of the Governor, the Department of Education, the Board of Governors of the State University System, or the Division of Emergency Management, as well as that portion of a public meeting which would reveal information related to a campus emergency response. (Taggart)

Public Meetings During Declared States of Emergency (Support) 

SB 674 (Cruz) suspends the physical quorum requirement for local governmental bodies during a declared state of emergency. The bill would allow meetings of any board or commission to be held via telephone, real-time videoconferencing or similar real-time electronic or video communication for no more than six months from the start of the declared state of emergency, unless extended by the governor by executive order. (Taggart) ...

SB 674 (Cruz) suspends the physical quorum requirement for local governmental bodies during a declared state of emergency. The bill would allow meetings of any board or commission to be held via telephone, real-time videoconferencing or similar real-time electronic or video communication for no more than six months from the start of the declared state of emergency, unless extended by the governor by executive order. (Taggart)

Public Records (Oppose)

SB 1472 (Stewart) requires agencies to respond to a public records request within five business days by: a) making the records available, b) denying the request or c) providing a statement of how long the request will take and the reason for the delay. (Taggart) ...

SB 1472 (Stewart) requires agencies to respond to a public records request within five business days by: a) making the records available, b) denying the request or c) providing a statement of how long the request will take and the reason for the delay. (Taggart)

Public Records Exemption for Animal Adoption (Watch)

HB 307 (Hawkins) and SB 716 (Bradley) provide a public records exemption for the personal information of individuals who adopt an animal from an animal shelter or animal control agency operated by a local government. (Taggart) ...

HB 307 (Hawkins) and SB 716 (Bradley) provide a public records exemption for the personal information of individuals who adopt an animal from an animal shelter or animal control agency operated by a local government. (Taggart)

Public Records/County and City Attorneys (Support) 

SB 1420 (Burgess) and HB 1213 (Arrington) create a public records exemption for the personal identifying and location information of current and former county and city attorneys and assistant county and city attorneys, as well as information regarding the spouses and children of those attorneys. (Taggart)  ...

SB 1420 (Burgess) and HB 1213 (Arrington) create a public records exemption for the personal identifying and location information of current and former county and city attorneys and assistant county and city attorneys, as well as information regarding the spouses and children of those attorneys. (Taggart)

Public Records/Crash Reports and Traffic Citations (Watch)

HB 1121 (Brannan) and CS/SB 1614 (Harrell) revise an exemption from public records requirements for written reports of crashes. Crash reports held by an agency may now be made available to any private person or entity acting on behalf of a federal, state or local governmental agency in carrying out its functions. (Taggart)  ...

HB 1121 (Brannan) and CS/SB 1614 (Harrell) revise an exemption from public records requirements for written reports of crashes. Crash reports held by an agency may now be made available to any private person or entity acting on behalf of a federal, state or local governmental agency in carrying out its functions. (Taggart)

Public Records/Law Enforcement Geolocation Information (Support)

HB 773 (Willhite) and SB 1046 (Hooper) exempt from public records requirements law enforcement officers and law enforcement vehicle geolocation information. The bills specify that the exemption would be applied retroactively. (Taggart) ...

HB 773 (Willhite) and SB 1046 (Hooper) exempt from public records requirements law enforcement officers and law enforcement vehicle geolocation information. The bills specify that the exemption would be applied retroactively. (Taggart)

Personal Information Protection (Watch)

HB 1547 (Overdorf) and SB 1848 (Gruters) prohibit public agencies from requiring an individual to provide personal information. The bills also prohibit agencies from releasing, publishing or otherwise publicly disclosing personal information. “Personal information” is defined as any compilation of data that directly or indirectly identifies a person as a member, supporter, volunteer or donor of a financial or nonfinancial support to any nonprofit entity. The bills specify how an impacted party may file a lawsuit, set fees for each violation and allow for a judge to award attorneys fees to the complaint bringing the action. (Taggart) ...

HB 1547 (Overdorf) and SB 1848 (Gruters) prohibit public agencies from requiring an individual to provide personal information. The bills also prohibit agencies from releasing, publishing or otherwise publicly disclosing personal information. “Personal information” is defined as any compilation of data that directly or indirectly identifies a person as a member, supporter, volunteer or donor of a financial or nonfinancial support to any nonprofit entity. The bills specify how an impacted party may file a lawsuit, set fees for each violation and allow for a judge to award attorneys fees to the complaint bringing the action. (Taggart)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 699 (McFarland) and SB 934 (Gruters) – Pub. Rec./Homelessness Counts and Databases ...

HB 699 (McFarland) and SB 934 (Gruters) – Pub. Rec./Homelessness Counts and Databases HB 983 (Stevenson) – Pub. Rec./Voters and Voter Registration SB 1282 (Diaz) – Public Records/Investigation of a Murder SB 1920 (Gruters) – Public Records/Election Workers

PUBLIC SAFETY

Active Shooter Alert System (Watch)

SB 1672 (Berman) and HB 1271 (Morales) provide for the development and implementation of an active shooter alert system by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The bills allow for FDLE to partner with local governments to assist in the development and implementation of the alert system. Once created and upon request by a local law enforcement agency, FDLE may activate the alert system to assist the local agency when responding to an active shooter event. (Taggart)  ...

SB 1672 (Berman) and HB 1271 (Morales) provide for the development and implementation of an active shooter alert system by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The bills allow for FDLE to partner with local governments to assist in the development and implementation of the alert system. Once created and upon request by a local law enforcement agency, FDLE may activate the alert system to assist the local agency when responding to an active shooter event. (Taggart)

Authorization of Restrictions Concerning Dangerous Dogs (Watch)

SB 614 (Garcia) and HB 721 (Buchanan) authorize certain housing authorities to adopt ordinances, rules or policies relating to dangerous dogs. The bills remove an exemption for local ordinances adopted before a specified date that pertain to dogs that have bitten or attacked persons or domestic animals. (Branch) ...

SB 614 (Garcia) and HB 721 (Buchanan) authorize certain housing authorities to adopt ordinances, rules or policies relating to dangerous dogs. The bills remove an exemption for local ordinances adopted before a specified date that pertain to dogs that have bitten or attacked persons or domestic animals. (Branch)

Boating Safety (Watch)

HB 493 (Botana) and SB 606 (Garcia) create additional safety provisions and requirements for boat liveries or privately owned boat rental companies. Of importance to local governments, the bills require livery owners to notify local law enforcement if a vessel is unnecessarily overdue more than one hour after the contracted time. Additionally, the bills appropriate funding for the creation of an Illegal Boating Strike Team for the purposes of increasing intergovernmental coordination while addressing illegal boating activity. (Taggart) ...

HB 493 (Botana) and SB 606 (Garcia) create additional safety provisions and requirements for boat liveries or privately owned boat rental companies. Of importance to local governments, the bills require livery owners to notify local law enforcement if a vessel is unnecessarily overdue more than one hour after the contracted time. Additionally, the bills appropriate funding for the creation of an Illegal Boating Strike Team for the purposes of increasing intergovernmental coordination while addressing illegal boating activity. (Taggart)

Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dogs (Support)

SB 226 (Powell) and CS/HB 25 (Killebrew) create the Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dog Program within the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The bills require that the FDLE contract with a nonprofit corporation to administer and manage the program. (Taggart) ...

SB 226 (Powell) and CS/HB 25 (Killebrew) create the Care for Retired Law Enforcement Dog Program within the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE). The bills require that the FDLE contract with a nonprofit corporation to administer and manage the program. (Taggart)

Code and Traffic Enforcement (Watch)

HB 1435 (Leek) and SB 1954 (Wright) authorize the Sheriff or Chief Administrative Officer of a municipality to designate a special event zone in response to a special event that takes place or is reasonably anticipated to take place on a roadway, street or highway within their jurisdiction. The bills define “special event” as an unpermitted temporary activity or event organized or promoted via social media that is attended by 50 or more people and substantially increases or disrupts the normal flow of traffic on those roadways. The bills require the Sheriff or Chief Administrative Officer to enforce ...

HB 1435 (Leek) and SB 1954 (Wright) authorize the Sheriff or Chief Administrative Officer of a municipality to designate a special event zone in response to a special event that takes place or is reasonably anticipated to take place on a roadway, street or highway within their jurisdiction. The bills define “special event” as an unpermitted temporary activity or event organized or promoted via social media that is attended by 50 or more people and substantially increases or disrupts the normal flow of traffic on those roadways. The bills require the Sheriff or Chief Administrative Officer to enforce the special event zone in a manner that causes the least inconvenience to the public. Special event zones must also: be designated with a warning sign at each point of ingress or egress, remain in effect as long as reasonably necessary to protect the public but not after the special event has dissipated. The bills authorize law enforcement to enforce occupancy limits on private or public property in a special event zone. Finally, the Sheriff or Chief Administrative Officer may recover all fees and costs associated with designating and enforcing the special event zone from the event promoter or organizer. (Taggart)

Drug-Related Overdose Prevention (Watch)

CS/SB 544 (Boyd) and CS/HB 731 (Caruso) require EMS providers to electronically report suspected or actual controlled substance overdoses using the Emergency Medical Service Tracking and Reporting System or other program as identified by department rule. Current law allows for optional reporting. (Taggart)  ...

CS/SB 544 (Boyd) and CS/HB 731 (Caruso) require EMS providers to electronically report suspected or actual controlled substance overdoses using the Emergency Medical Service Tracking and Reporting System or other program as identified by department rule. Current law allows for optional reporting. (Taggart)

First Responder Roadway Safety (Watch)

HB 127 (Slosberg) prohibits the use of handheld wireless devices while operating a motor vehicle where first responders are actively working. This bill does provide several exceptions, such as first responders performing in their official capacity or drivers accessing safety-related information, including emergency, traffic or weather alerts. (Branch) ...

HB 127 (Slosberg) prohibits the use of handheld wireless devices while operating a motor vehicle where first responders are actively working. This bill does provide several exceptions, such as first responders performing in their official capacity or drivers accessing safety-related information, including emergency, traffic or weather alerts. (Branch)

Florida Hometown Hero Housing Program (Watch)

SB 788 (Hooper) creates the Florida Hometown Hero Housing Program to assist frontline emergency workers, certain medical and health care personnel and educators in purchasing a home as their primary residence. (Branch) ...

SB 788 (Hooper) creates the Florida Hometown Hero Housing Program to assist frontline emergency workers, certain medical and health care personnel and educators in purchasing a home as their primary residence. (Branch)

Human Trafficking Public Awareness Signs (Watch) 

SB 652 (Cruz) requires the employer of each athletic venue, entertainment venue and convention center capable of accommodating 5,000 persons or more to display a human trafficking public awareness sign. (Taggart) ...

SB 652 (Cruz) requires the employer of each athletic venue, entertainment venue and convention center capable of accommodating 5,000 persons or more to display a human trafficking public awareness sign. (Taggart)

Impeding, Provoking or Harassing Law Enforcement Officers (Watch)

HB 11 (Rizo) and SB 1872 (Bean) prohibit a person from approaching a law enforcement officer after receiving a warning with intent to impede, provoke or harass. (Taggart) ...

HB 11 (Rizo) and SB 1872 (Bean) prohibit a person from approaching a law enforcement officer after receiving a warning with intent to impede, provoke or harass. (Taggart)

Law Enforcement Officer Body Cameras and Vehicle Dash Cameras (Oppose)

SB 1494 (Bracy) requires each law enforcement agency in this state to mandate that its ...

SB 1494 (Bracy) requires each law enforcement agency in this state to mandate that its law enforcement officers wear body cameras and use vehicle dash cameras. (Taggart)

Offenses Against Firefighters (Support)

SB 370 (Hooper) and HB 351 (Duggan) add service as a firefighter as grounds for increased criminal penalties for certain criminal offenses. (Taggart) ...

SB 370 (Hooper) and HB 351 (Duggan) add service as a firefighter as grounds for increased criminal penalties for certain criminal offenses. (Taggart)

Photographic Enforcement of School Zone Speed Limits (Watch)

HB 189 (Duran), SB 410 (Rodriguez) and HB 797 (Overdorf) authorize a county or municipality to contract with a vendor to install cameras in school speed zones to enforce speed limits. Within the first 30 days after such a camera or cameras are installed in a school speed zone, a motor vehicle operator found to have violated the speed limit will be issued a warning and will not be liable for the civil penalty. (Branch) ...

HB 189 (Duran), SB 410 (Rodriguez) and HB 797 (Overdorf) authorize a county or municipality to contract with a vendor to install cameras in school speed zones to enforce speed limits. Within the first 30 days after such a camera or cameras are installed in a school speed zone, a motor vehicle operator found to have violated the speed limit will be issued a warning and will not be liable for the civil penalty. (Branch)

Repeal Preemption of Firearms and Ammunition (Support)

SB 496 (Taddeo) and HB 6049 (Daley) repeal the current statutory preemption prohibiting cities and counties from regulating firearms and ammunition. (Taggart) ...

SB 496 (Taddeo) and HB 6049 (Daley) repeal the current statutory preemption prohibiting cities and counties from regulating firearms and ammunition. (Taggart)

School Safety (Watch)

SB 802 (Gruters) and HB 1421 (Hawkins) require the Department of Education to work with local emergency management and law enforcement personnel to create a model reunification plan for use by child care facilities, K-12 schools and public postsecondary educational institutions for schools that are unexpectedly evacuated due to a disaster. Each school district will be required to adopt a district-specific plan by working with local law enforcement. The model plan will be required to be reviewed annually. The bills also require law enforcement officers responsible for responding to specific schools in the event of an active assailant ...

SB 802 (Gruters) and HB 1421 (Hawkins) require the Department of Education to work with local emergency management and law enforcement personnel to create a model reunification plan for use by child care facilities, K-12 schools and public postsecondary educational institutions for schools that are unexpectedly evacuated due to a disaster. Each school district will be required to adopt a district-specific plan by working with local law enforcement. The model plan will be required to be reviewed annually. The bills also require law enforcement officers responsible for responding to specific schools in the event of an active assailant emergency to be physically present on campus during the execution of active assailant emergency drills. The bills also direct the Department of Education to consult with local constituencies to establish minimum drill policies relating to the timing, frequency, participation, training, notification, accommodations and responses to threat situations by incident type, as well as to school level and characteristics. The bills specify that these drills be conducted at least annually. (Taggart)

Statewide Police Misconduct Registry (Watch)

SB 1482 (Bracy) requires the Department of Law Enforcement to establish and maintain a statewide police misconduct registry by June 30, 2023. The bill also specifies the type of incidents and complaints that would be required to be reported by the local agency. The bill would require this reporting to begin January 2, 2024, and information submitted every three months thereafter by the head of each local agency. (Taggart) ...

SB 1482 (Bracy) requires the Department of Law Enforcement to establish and maintain a statewide police misconduct registry by June 30, 2023. The bill also specifies the type of incidents and complaints that would be required to be reported by the local agency. The bill would require this reporting to begin January 2, 2024, and information submitted every three months thereafter by the head of each local agency. (Taggart)

Telecommunicator Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (Watch)

SB 890 (Burgess) and HB 593 (Trabulsy) require an employee of a public safety agency who answers emergency medical service calls to provide direct telephonic assistance in administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation or transfer calls to a dedicated telephone line, call center or other public safety agency with which the transferring public safety agency has a reciprocal agreement. The bills also require all 911 public safety telecommunicators who take telephone calls and provide dispatch functions for emergency medical conditions to complete telecommunicator cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and continuing education as deemed appropriate by the Department of Health. (Taggart) ...

SB 890 (Burgess) and HB 593 (Trabulsy) require an employee of a public safety agency who answers emergency medical service calls to provide direct telephonic assistance in administering cardiopulmonary resuscitation or transfer calls to a dedicated telephone line, call center or other public safety agency with which the transferring public safety agency has a reciprocal agreement. The bills also require all 911 public safety telecommunicators who take telephone calls and provide dispatch functions for emergency medical conditions to complete telecommunicator cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and continuing education as deemed appropriate by the Department of Health. (Taggart)

Traffic Infraction Detectors (Oppose) 

HB 6029 (Sabatini) preempts cities, counties and the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles from installing, maintaining or utilizing red light cameras effective July 1, 2025. (Branch) ...

HB 6029 (Sabatini) preempts cities, counties and the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles from installing, maintaining or utilizing red light cameras effective July 1, 2025. (Branch)

Two-way Radio Communication Enhancement Systems (Watch)

HB 785 (Botana) and SB 1190 (Boyd) authorize the use of two-way radio communication enhancement systems to comply with certain radio signal strength requirements in the Florida Building Code. The bills exempt apartment buildings that are 75 feet or less in height from requiring two-way radio communication systems. (Branch) ...

HB 785 (Botana) and SB 1190 (Boyd) authorize the use of two-way radio communication enhancement systems to comply with certain radio signal strength requirements in the Florida Building Code. The bills exempt apartment buildings that are 75 feet or less in height from requiring two-way radio communication systems. (Branch)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 75 (Sabatini), SB 592 (Perry) and SB 594 (Perry) – Limiting COVID-19 Restrictions ...

HB 75 (Sabatini), SB 592 (Perry) and SB 594 (Perry) – Limiting COVID-19 Restrictions HB 179 (Altman) and SB 702 (Burgess) – Photographic Enforcement of School Bus Safety HB 6009 (Sabatini), HB 6069 (Shoaf) and SB 734 (Gruters) – Vaccinations During Public Health Emergencies HB 297 (Aloupis) and SB 476 (Book) – Aggressive Careless Driving SB 1230 (Pizzo) – COVID-19 Mandates SB 1234 (Pizzo) – Vaccinations During Public Health Emergency SB 1232 (Pizzo) – Florida Occupational Safety and Health State Plan HB 19 (Gottlieb) and SB 402 (Polsky) – Firearm Restrictions Pursuant to Court Findings or Risk Protection Orders HB 73 (Rayner) and SB 888 (Jones) – Use or Threatened Use of Force HB 83 (Eskamani) and SB 372 (Berman) – Domestic Violence HB 103 (Sabatini) – Carrying of Firearms Without a License HB 109 (McCurdy) – Prohibiting Deception in Interrogations of Minors HB 133 (Sabatini) – Prohibiting Cooperation with a United States Capitol Police Officer Located in this State HB 181 (Daley) and SB 334 (Polsky) – Sales of Ammunition HB 199 (Smith, C.) and SB 214 (Farmer) – Assault Weapons and Large-capacity Magazines SB 204 (Farmer) – Sale and Delivery of Firearms SB 210 (Farmer) – Prohibited Recordkeeping Relating to Firearms  or Firearm Owners HB 347 (Rayner), SB 1166 (Polsky), and SB 220 (Farmer) and – Sale, Transfer, or Storage of Firearms HB 363 (Hart) and SB 630 (Jones) – Pregnant Women in Custody SB 458 (Torres) and HB 665 (Goff-Marcil) – Secure Storage of Firearms SB 502 (Rodriguez) – Certificates of Public Convenience and Necessity SB 660 (Cruz) – Sexual Offense Victims' Rights SB 668 (Cruz) – Custodial Interrogations of Minors  SB 672 (Cruz) – School Safety Funding SB 860 (Stewart) and SB 862 (Stewart) – Firearms Without a Unique Serial Number or Identifying Mark SB 872 (Polsky) and HB 527 (Hunschofsky) – Unfinished Firearms SB 874 (Pizzo) – Arrests HB 883 (Slosberg-King) and SB 1208 (Polsky) – Reclassification of Crimes Evidencing Prejudice HB 889 (Overdorf) and SB 1406 (Perry) – Delayed Arraignment SB 916 (Brandes) – Searches of Cellular Phones and Other Electronic Devices  HB 817 (Massullo) and SB 1114 (Bradley) – Emergency Medical Care Treatment to Minors Without Parental Consent  HB 1021 (Fernandez-Barquin) and SB 1392 (Garcia) – Patient Identification and Health Care Decisions HB 1083 (Benjamin) and SB 1856 (Pizz) – Citizen Arrests SB 1196, SB 1198 (Jones) and HB 1093 (Hunschofsky)– Community Violence Task Force SB 1236 (Jones) and HB 1561 (Bush) – County and Municipal Detention Facilities SB 1262 (Burgess) and HB 1277 (Massullo) – Mental Health and Substance Abuse HB 1255 (Valdes) and SB 1760 (Powell) – Duties of the Inspector General of the Department of Corrections SB 1528 (Gruters) and HB 6095 (Gregory) – Restrictions on Firearms and Ammunition During Emergencies SB 1632 (Farmer) – Searches by Law Enforcement Officers SB 1882 (Powell) – Use of Police Canines SB 1932 (Hooper) – Sexual Offenders and Predators HB 6007 (Sabatini) – License to Carry Concealed Weapons or Firearms HB 6013 (Sabatini) – Removing Firearm Regulations HB 6115 (Joseph) – Use of Deadly Force in Defense of a Person

SHORT-TERM RENTALS

Local Regulation of Vessels (Support)

HB 1265 (Caruso) authorizes local governments to regulate the anchoring of vessels used for short-term rental purposes in violation of a local ordinance or regulation. (Taggart) ...

HB 1265 (Caruso) authorizes local governments to regulate the anchoring of vessels used for short-term rental purposes in violation of a local ordinance or regulation. (Taggart)

Preemption of the Regulation of Vacation Rentals (Support)

HB 6033 (Grieco) repeals all preemption provisions in current law relating to the local regulation of vacation rentals. (Taggart) ...

HB 6033 (Grieco) repeals all preemption provisions in current law relating to the local regulation of vacation rentals. (Taggart)

Vacation Rentals (Watch)

SB 512 (Burgess) and HB 325 (Fischer)  ...

SB 512 (Burgess) and HB 325 (Fischer)  Impact on Local Governments The bills maintain the current preemption on local governments from adopting zoning ordinances specific to short-term rentals, as well as regulating the duration of stays and the frequency in which the properties are rented. The bills expand this preemption to include local regulations on advertising platforms. For cities that adopted ordinances prior to June 1, 2011, the bills maintain the "grandfather" currently in place but clarify that those cities may amend their ordinances to be less restrictive or to comply with a local registration program. For cities that do not have "grandfathered" protections, the bills preempt cities from licensing short-term rentals; however, they authorize local governments to have a local registration program.  Local governments who choose to adopt a local registration program may impose a fine for failure to register. The local government has 15 days after receiving an application for registration to either accept the application or issue a written notice specifying all deficiencies. Both parties may agree to extend the timeline. If a municipality does not accept or deny an application within that 15-day window, that application is deemed approved. As a condition of registration, the local registration programs may only require the owner or operator of a vacation rental to: •Pay a fee of no more than $50 for processing the registration application. •Renew their registration no more than once per year unless the property has a change in ownership.  •Submit identifying information about the owner or the property manager and the short-term rental being registered. •Obtain a license as a transient public lodging establishment by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) within 60 days of local registration. •Obtain all required tax registration, receipts or certificates issued by the Department of Revenue, a county or a municipal government.  •Maintain all registration information on a continuing basis so it is current. •Comply with parking and solid waste handling requirements. These requirements cannot be imposed solely on short-term rentals. •Designate and maintain a property designee who can respond to complaints and other immediate problems related to the property, including being available by phone. •Pay in full all municipal or county code liens against the property being registered.  Impact on Advertising Platforms and DBPR Advertising platforms must include in all listings the property's state license number, and if applicable, the local registration number. After July 1, 2023, the advertising platform will be required to check and verify the license number of all listings with DBPR. Additionally, by that date, DBPR will be required to maintain all short-term rental license information in an electronic format to ensure prompt compliance. Advertising platforms will be required to remove unlicensed listings within 15 days after notification by DBPR, as well as collect and remit all required taxes.  Termination/Denial of License DBPR may revoke, refuse to issue or renew a short-term rental license or suspend the license for up to 30 days under several circumstances: •The property owner violates the terms of any lease or applicable condominium, coop or homeowner's association restrictions.  •The owner fails to provide proof of local registration if one is required. •The local registration is terminated by a local government for violating any of the registration requirements described above. •The property and property owner are subject to a final order or judgment directing termination of the properties short-term rental status. •DBPR may also suspend the license for up to 30 days when the short-term rental has been cited for two or more code enforcement violations during a 90-day period. (Taggart)

Hourly Rates at Public Lodging Establishments and Vacation Rentals (Support)

SB 1852 (Bradley) and HB 1439 (Toledo) prohibit vacation rental operators from offering an hourly rate for an accommodation. HB 1439 also requires guests to provide positive proof of identification. (Taggart) ...

SB 1852 (Bradley) and HB 1439 (Toledo) prohibit vacation rental operators from offering an hourly rate for an accommodation. HB 1439 also requires guests to provide positive proof of identification. (Taggart)

TRANSPORTATION

Advanced Air Mobility (Support)

SB 728 (Harrell) and HB 1005 (Fischer) create the Advanced Air Mobility Study Task Force adjunct to the Department of Transportation with the FDOT secretary, or the secretary's designee, serving as chair. The bills direct the task force to hold public hearings in locations throughout the state to assess and describe the current state of development of the advanced air mobility industry as well as collaborate with local governments to evaluate the potential integration of advanced air mobility into transportation plans. The bills list the Florida League of Cities as a member of this task force. (Branch) ...

SB 728 (Harrell) and HB 1005 (Fischer) create the Advanced Air Mobility Study Task Force adjunct to the Department of Transportation with the FDOT secretary, or the secretary's designee, serving as chair. The bills direct the task force to hold public hearings in locations throughout the state to assess and describe the current state of development of the advanced air mobility industry as well as collaborate with local governments to evaluate the potential integration of advanced air mobility into transportation plans. The bills list the Florida League of Cities as a member of this task force. (Branch)

Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure (Support)

SB 918 (Brandes) creates the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Grant Program to provide financial assistance to municipalities and other entities for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The bill authorizes the Department of Transportation to develop and publish criteria for the grant application. (Branch)  ...

SB 918 (Brandes) creates the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Grant Program to provide financial assistance to municipalities and other entities for the installation of electric vehicle charging infrastructure. The bill authorizes the Department of Transportation to develop and publish criteria for the grant application. (Branch)

Fees/Electric Vehicles and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (Support)

SB 908 (Brandes) creates additional fees and a licensing tax for electric and hybrid vehicles. The bill provides criteria and timeframes for the collection and disbursements of fees. This bill is linked to SB 918. (Branch)  ...

SB 908 (Brandes) creates additional fees and a licensing tax for electric and hybrid vehicles. The bill provides criteria and timeframes for the collection and disbursements of fees. This bill is linked to SB 918. (Branch)

Tampa Bay Area Regional Transit Authority (Watch)

SB 426 (Brandes) dissolves the Tampa Bay Area Regional Transit Authority. The bill requires the Authority to discharge its liabilities and settle and close its activities and affairs. The bill also provides for the distribution of the Authority's assets or the proceeds of such assets, such that each local general-purpose government represented on the Authority's board receives a distribution generally in proportion to each entity's contribution to the acquisition of the assets. (Branch) ...

SB 426 (Brandes) dissolves the Tampa Bay Area Regional Transit Authority. The bill requires the Authority to discharge its liabilities and settle and close its activities and affairs. The bill also provides for the distribution of the Authority's assets or the proceeds of such assets, such that each local general-purpose government represented on the Authority's board receives a distribution generally in proportion to each entity's contribution to the acquisition of the assets. (Branch)

Transportation Network Companies (Watch)

SB 696 (Perry) and HB 445 (Botana) limit certain fees charged by airports or seaports. The bill does not prohibit fees associated with pickup, as long as the pickup fees do not exceed $2 per ride. If an airport or seaport is charging a pickup fee, they may not intentionally remove, degrade or otherwise impede access to any service, benefit or infrastructure, including, but not limited to, staging lots, curb access and driver rest facilities made available to a transportation network company before January 1, 2021. (Branch)  ...

SB 696 (Perry) and HB 445 (Botana) limit certain fees charged by airports or seaports. The bill does not prohibit fees associated with pickup, as long as the pickup fees do not exceed $2 per ride. If an airport or seaport is charging a pickup fee, they may not intentionally remove, degrade or otherwise impede access to any service, benefit or infrastructure, including, but not limited to, staging lots, curb access and driver rest facilities made available to a transportation network company before January 1, 2021. (Branch)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 145 (Hage) and SB 474 (Perry) – Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Weight Limits ...

HB 145 (Hage) and SB 474 (Perry) – Recreational Off-Highway Vehicle Weight Limits HB 157 (Andrade) and SB 398 (Hooper) – Transportation Projects HB 737 (Borrero) and SB 920 (Perry) – Electric Vehicle Transportation Electrification Plan SB 914 (Harrell) and HB 871 (Brannan) – Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles

UTILITIES & NATURAL RESOURCES

Agricultural Practices (Watch)

SB 904 (Farmer) and HB 807 (Rayner) require, rather than authorize, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to develop and adopt rules for interim measures, best management practices or other measures to achieve certain levels of pollution reduction statewide. (O'Hara) ...

SB 904 (Farmer) and HB 807 (Rayner) require, rather than authorize, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to develop and adopt rules for interim measures, best management practices or other measures to achieve certain levels of pollution reduction statewide. (O'Hara)

Bottled Water Excise Tax (Watch)

HB 473 (Casello) and SB 798 (Taddeo) impose an excise tax on bottled water operators and specify the tax proceeds must be used to provide grants and loans to local governmental agencies for water projects, with priority given to septic-to-sewer conversion projects. (O'Hara) ...

HB 473 (Casello) and SB 798 (Taddeo) impose an excise tax on bottled water operators and specify the tax proceeds must be used to provide grants and loans to local governmental agencies for water projects, with priority given to septic-to-sewer conversion projects. (O'Hara)

Caloosahatchee River Watershed (Watch)

HB 585 (Botana) prohibits the land application of septage from onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems within the Caloosahatchee River watershed. The bill directs the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt an updated Caloosahatchee estuary basin management action plan (BMAP), which shall include the following: an implementation schedule to achieve nutrient load reductions necessary to meet total maximum daily load requirements for wastewater treatment facilities by 2027; an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system remediation plan and implementation schedule to meet nutrient load reductions for such systems by 2027; and a municipal stormwater remediation plan that requires an ...

HB 585 (Botana) prohibits the land application of septage from onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems within the Caloosahatchee River watershed. The bill directs the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt an updated Caloosahatchee estuary basin management action plan (BMAP), which shall include the following: an implementation schedule to achieve nutrient load reductions necessary to meet total maximum daily load requirements for wastewater treatment facilities by 2027; an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system remediation plan and implementation schedule to meet nutrient load reductions for such systems by 2027; and a municipal stormwater remediation plan that requires an implementation schedule to achieve stormwater nutrient load reductions by 2027. Lastly, the bill prohibits new domestic wastewater disposal facilities within the watershed, except for those facilities that meet advanced wastewater treatment standards and new septic systems on lots of less than 1 acre, if the addition of a specific system will conflict with the remediation plan. (O'Hara)

Certified Pile Burning (Oppose)

HB 6027 (Sabatini) amends current law relating to the open burning of debris from agricultural, silvicultural, land-clearing or tree-cutting activities, which is regulated and authorized by the Florida Forest Service. Currently, the law specifies the debris must originate onsite. HB 6027 would remove the onsite requirement, which would authorize the open burning of debris originating offsite as well as onsite. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6027 (Sabatini) amends current law relating to the open burning of debris from agricultural, silvicultural, land-clearing or tree-cutting activities, which is regulated and authorized by the Florida Forest Service. Currently, the law specifies the debris must originate onsite. HB 6027 would remove the onsite requirement, which would authorize the open burning of debris originating offsite as well as onsite. (O'Hara)

Development of Current or Former Agricultural Land (Watch)

SB 1210 (Albritton) and HB 909 (Payne) provide that the application of pesticides as part of agricultural operations is presumed to be lawful. The bills authorize the subdivision of pesticide mixing areas on agricultural lands for environmental evaluation and remediation. The bills exempt agricultural land that meets site assessment and remedial activity requirements from further regulation by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The bills authorize property owners to voluntarily apply for brownfield site rehabilitation activities. The bills require certain assurances and notices to be provided to DEP before such properties are redeveloped and prohibit DEP from requiring ...

SB 1210 (Albritton) and HB 909 (Payne) provide that the application of pesticides as part of agricultural operations is presumed to be lawful. The bills authorize the subdivision of pesticide mixing areas on agricultural lands for environmental evaluation and remediation. The bills exempt agricultural land that meets site assessment and remedial activity requirements from further regulation by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). The bills authorize property owners to voluntarily apply for brownfield site rehabilitation activities. The bills require certain assurances and notices to be provided to DEP before such properties are redeveloped and prohibit DEP from requiring specified management activities. The bills provide the DEP Secretary has exclusive jurisdiction for certain evaluations and assessments and further specify that such authority may not be delegated to a county, a municipality or other unit of local government through a local pollution control program. (O'Hara)

Discharge and Use of Firefighting Foam (Watch)

HB 1257 (Casello) and SB 1666 (Polsky) prohibit the use of Class B firefighting foam (contains PFAS) beginning in 2023. The bills provide exceptions for the use of Class B foam in response to fire prevention or in an emergency firefighting operation. (O'Hara) ...

HB 1257 (Casello) and SB 1666 (Polsky) prohibit the use of Class B firefighting foam (contains PFAS) beginning in 2023. The bills provide exceptions for the use of Class B foam in response to fire prevention or in an emergency firefighting operation. (O'Hara)

Energy (Watch)

SB 548 (Polsky) and HB 491 (Skidmore) address a variety of energy and renewable energy issues. It establishes a tax credit for electricity produced from a renewable energy source located on a farm operation and authorizes the state to lease manmade stormwater systems for floating solar energy systems. The bill requires the state to adopt rules for a renewable and energy efficiency portfolio standard. (O'Hara) ...

SB 548 (Polsky) and HB 491 (Skidmore) address a variety of energy and renewable energy issues. It establishes a tax credit for electricity produced from a renewable energy source located on a farm operation and authorizes the state to lease manmade stormwater systems for floating solar energy systems. The bill requires the state to adopt rules for a renewable and energy efficiency portfolio standard. (O'Hara)

Everglades Protection Area/Comprehensive Plan Amendments (Watch)

SB 932 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 729 (Aloupis) require comprehensive plans and plan amendments that apply to any land within, or within 2 miles of, the Everglades Protection Area to follow the state coordinated review process for state agency compliance review under Part II, Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. The bill also requires the Department of Environmental Protection to coordinate with the affected local governments on mitigation measures for plans or plan amendments that would impact Everglades restoration. (O'Hara) ...

SB 932 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 729 (Aloupis) require comprehensive plans and plan amendments that apply to any land within, or within 2 miles of, the Everglades Protection Area to follow the state coordinated review process for state agency compliance review under Part II, Chapter 163, Florida Statutes. The bill also requires the Department of Environmental Protection to coordinate with the affected local governments on mitigation measures for plans or plan amendments that would impact Everglades restoration. (O'Hara)

Golf Course Best Management Practices Certification (Watch)

HB 967 (Truenow) and SB 1556 (Gruters) direct the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to work with the turfgrass science program at University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Services to administer certification for golf course best management practices for fertilization and provide and approve training and testing programs. Certified persons would be exempt from additional local government testing requirements and exempt from local ordinances relating to water and fertilizer use blackout periods or restrictions unless a state of emergency is declared. The bills provide for DEP to share information about certified persons with governmental entities and ...

HB 967 (Truenow) and SB 1556 (Gruters) direct the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to work with the turfgrass science program at University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Services to administer certification for golf course best management practices for fertilization and provide and approve training and testing programs. Certified persons would be exempt from additional local government testing requirements and exempt from local ordinances relating to water and fertilizer use blackout periods or restrictions unless a state of emergency is declared. The bills provide for DEP to share information about certified persons with governmental entities and create an online registry. (O'Hara)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Watch)

SB 380 (Rodriguez) and HB 463 (Melo) prohibit state and regional agencies from adopting or enforcing state and regional programs to regulate greenhouse gas emissions without specific legislative authorization. (O'Hara) ...

SB 380 (Rodriguez) and HB 463 (Melo) prohibit state and regional agencies from adopting or enforcing state and regional programs to regulate greenhouse gas emissions without specific legislative authorization. (O'Hara)

Implementation of Recommendations of Blue-Green Algae Task Force (Watch)

SB 832 (Stewart) and HB 561 (Goff-Marcil) require onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems to be inspected once every five years and require the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to administer the inspection program and requirements. The bills also require DEP to assess the efficacy of projects listed within a basin management action plan having a total cost exceeding $1 million. (O'Hara) ...

SB 832 (Stewart) and HB 561 (Goff-Marcil) require onsite sewage treatment and disposal systems to be inspected once every five years and require the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to administer the inspection program and requirements. The bills also require DEP to assess the efficacy of projects listed within a basin management action plan having a total cost exceeding $1 million. (O'Hara)

Infrastructure Project Funding/Transfers of Utility Revenues (Oppose)

HB 621 (Fine) and SB 1162 (Broxson) prohibit specified state agencies and water management districts from disbursing state funds (including grants) for local government infrastructure, water and resiliency projects if the local government transfers its utility revenues (other than the costs of administrative and support services under a cost allocation plan) for use in providing general government functions and services. (Branch) ...

HB 621 (Fine) and SB 1162 (Broxson) prohibit specified state agencies and water management districts from disbursing state funds (including grants) for local government infrastructure, water and resiliency projects if the local government transfers its utility revenues (other than the costs of administrative and support services under a cost allocation plan) for use in providing general government functions and services. (Branch)

Inventories of Critical Wetlands (Watch)

SB 882 (Brodeur) and HB 761 (Truenow) require each water management district governing board, in cooperation with local governments, to develop a list of critical wetlands for acquisition using funds from the Land Acquisition Trust Fund. The bill specifies criteria the water management districts should consider in designating a wetland for inclusion on the list. (O'Hara) ...

SB 882 (Brodeur) and HB 761 (Truenow) require each water management district governing board, in cooperation with local governments, to develop a list of critical wetlands for acquisition using funds from the Land Acquisition Trust Fund. The bill specifies criteria the water management districts should consider in designating a wetland for inclusion on the list. (O'Hara)

Land Acquisition Funding (Support)

HB 1377 (Roth) and SB 1816 (Stewart) extend the retirement date of bonds issued to fund the Florida Forever Act from 2040 to 2054. HB 1377 revises the percentage distributions of Land Acquisition Trust Fund (LATF) proceeds and requires the annual appropriation to Florida Forever from the LATF to be a minimum of the lesser of 40% or $350 million. SB 1816 requires the annual appropriation from the LATF to Florida Forever to be $100 million. Both bills also prohibit LATF monies from being used for state agency executive direction and support services. (O'Hara) ...

HB 1377 (Roth) and SB 1816 (Stewart) extend the retirement date of bonds issued to fund the Florida Forever Act from 2040 to 2054. HB 1377 revises the percentage distributions of Land Acquisition Trust Fund (LATF) proceeds and requires the annual appropriation to Florida Forever from the LATF to be a minimum of the lesser of 40% or $350 million. SB 1816 requires the annual appropriation from the LATF to Florida Forever to be $100 million. Both bills also prohibit LATF monies from being used for state agency executive direction and support services. (O'Hara)

Legal Rights of the Natural Environment (Watch)

HB 6003 (Eskamani) and SB 1854 (Farmer) repeal provisions of current law prohibiting local governments from recognizing or granting certain legal rights to the natural environment or granting such rights relating to the natural environment to a person or political subdivision. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6003 (Eskamani) and SB 1854 (Farmer) repeal provisions of current law prohibiting local governments from recognizing or granting certain legal rights to the natural environment or granting such rights relating to the natural environment to a person or political subdivision. (O'Hara)

Licensure for Tree Care Services (Support)

SB 1448 (Ausley) establishes the Florida Board of Tree Experts within the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and requires the Board to develop or designate a licensure examination for licensed Florida arborists. The bill provides requirements for licensure as a licensed Florida arborist and a licensed tree care practitioner and provides grounds for the Board to suspend, revoke or refuse to issue or renew a permit. The bill requires a business engaged in tree care services to biennially register with the Board. (O'Hara) ...

SB 1448 (Ausley) establishes the Florida Board of Tree Experts within the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and requires the Board to develop or designate a licensure examination for licensed Florida arborists. The bill provides requirements for licensure as a licensed Florida arborist and a licensed tree care practitioner and provides grounds for the Board to suspend, revoke or refuse to issue or renew a permit. The bill requires a business engaged in tree care services to biennially register with the Board. (O'Hara)

Local Government Solid Waste  and Recycling Collection Services (Oppose)

SB 1944 (Baxley) and HB 1241 (Hawkins) prohibit local governments from seeking liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges against a solid waste management or recycling entity for action or inaction during a local, state, or federal emergency. The bills also cap the amount of liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges that may be sought against a waste or recycling company to 50 percent of the amount billed to the customer for collection services at the daily rate. SB 1944 applies to contracts executed or renewed on or after July 1, 2022; HB 1241 applies ...

SB 1944 (Baxley) and HB 1241 (Hawkins) prohibit local governments from seeking liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges against a solid waste management or recycling entity for action or inaction during a local, state, or federal emergency. The bills also cap the amount of liquidated damages, administrative fees, or other similar charges that may be sought against a waste or recycling company to 50 percent of the amount billed to the customer for collection services at the daily rate. SB 1944 applies to contracts executed or renewed on or after July 1, 2022; HB 1241 applies retroactively to existing contracts. (O'Hara)

Municipal Solid Waste-to-Energy Program (Watch)

SB 1764 (Albritton) and HB 1419 (Mariano) create the Municipal Solid Waste-to-Energy Program within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and require the department to provide financial assistance grants to municipal solid waste-to-energy facilities that have entered into power purchase agreements with electric utilities that include capacity payments, and the facility will no longer receive capacity payments under the agreement. The bills also direct the department to provide incentive grants to waste-to-energy facilities to assist with constructing, upgrading, or expanding a facility. (O'Hara)  ...

SB 1764 (Albritton) and HB 1419 (Mariano) create the Municipal Solid Waste-to-Energy Program within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services and require the department to provide financial assistance grants to municipal solid waste-to-energy facilities that have entered into power purchase agreements with electric utilities that include capacity payments, and the facility will no longer receive capacity payments under the agreement. The bills also direct the department to provide incentive grants to waste-to-energy facilities to assist with constructing, upgrading, or expanding a facility. (O'Hara)

Municipal Water and Sewer Utility Rates (Oppose)

SB 886 (Jones) and HB 515 (Robinson, F.) require a municipal water or sewer utility that serves customers in another recipient municipality using infrastructure located in the recipient municipality to charge consumers in the recipient municipality the same rates, fees and charges as it does the consumers inside its municipal boundaries. (Branch) ...

SB 886 (Jones) and HB 515 (Robinson, F.) require a municipal water or sewer utility that serves customers in another recipient municipality using infrastructure located in the recipient municipality to charge consumers in the recipient municipality the same rates, fees and charges as it does the consumers inside its municipal boundaries. (Branch)

Net Metering (Watch)

SB 1024 (Bradley) and HB 741 (McClure) revise current law relating to net metering to avoid the consequence of ratepayers that do not use renewable energy sources from subsidizing electric service costs of other ratepayers who use net metering and renewable energy sources. The bills require the Public Service Commission to propose new net metering rules that will ensure that utility customers using renewable energy generation pay the full cost of electric service and are not subsidized by the utility's general body of ratepayers. The bills authorize certain customers who own or lease renewable generation before a specified ...

SB 1024 (Bradley) and HB 741 (McClure) revise current law relating to net metering to avoid the consequence of ratepayers that do not use renewable energy sources from subsidizing electric service costs of other ratepayers who use net metering and renewable energy sources. The bills require the Public Service Commission to propose new net metering rules that will ensure that utility customers using renewable energy generation pay the full cost of electric service and are not subsidized by the utility's general body of ratepayers. The bills authorize certain customers who own or lease renewable generation before a specified date to remain under existing net metering rules for a 10-year period. (O'Hara)

Office of the Blue Economy (Watch)

SB 1454 (Ausley) and HB 1081 (Skidmore) establish the Office of the Blue Economy within the Department of Economic Opportunity and provides duties of the Office. The term "blue economy" means the economic uses of ocean and coastal resources with a focus on sustainable practices and the competitive positioning of the state in a global economy affected by climate change. It includes maritime industries as well as tourism and outdoor recreational activities. It also requires the Office of Economic and Demographic Research to conduct a biennial evaluation of the blue economy for inclusion in its annual state water ...

SB 1454 (Ausley) and HB 1081 (Skidmore) establish the Office of the Blue Economy within the Department of Economic Opportunity and provides duties of the Office. The term "blue economy" means the economic uses of ocean and coastal resources with a focus on sustainable practices and the competitive positioning of the state in a global economy affected by climate change. It includes maritime industries as well as tourism and outdoor recreational activities. It also requires the Office of Economic and Demographic Research to conduct a biennial evaluation of the blue economy for inclusion in its annual state water resources assessment. (O'Hara)

Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal System Inspections (Support)

HB 1125 (Caruso) directs the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to administer an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system periodic inspection program. It requires owners of certain systems to have periodic inspections of such systems every five years and to pay for the costs of such inspections, as well as any repairs or replacements. It authorizes local governments to create grant programs for homeowners' replacement costs. It directs DEP to submit program reports to the Governor, Legislature, Chief Science Officer and the Blue-Green Algae Task Force. (O'Hara) ...

HB 1125 (Caruso) directs the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to administer an onsite sewage treatment and disposal system periodic inspection program. It requires owners of certain systems to have periodic inspections of such systems every five years and to pay for the costs of such inspections, as well as any repairs or replacements. It authorizes local governments to create grant programs for homeowners' replacement costs. It directs DEP to submit program reports to the Governor, Legislature, Chief Science Officer and the Blue-Green Algae Task Force. (O'Hara)

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) Task Force (Support)

SB 7012 (Environment and Natural Resources Committee) and HB 1151 (Sirois) create a 15-member task force within the Department of Environmental Protection and specify its members, which include a representative from the League. The bills direct the task force to develop recommendations for enforceable regulatory standards, a mechanism for identification and cleanup of contaminated areas, methods to address liability for contamination and responsibility for cleanup, appropriate methods and technologies for cleanup, funding sources for cleanup and remediation, methods to manage PFAS waste, appropriate testing for PFAS, and methods to eliminate workforce exposure. The bills direct the task force ...

SB 7012 (Environment and Natural Resources Committee) and HB 1151 (Sirois) create a 15-member task force within the Department of Environmental Protection and specify its members, which include a representative from the League. The bills direct the task force to develop recommendations for enforceable regulatory standards, a mechanism for identification and cleanup of contaminated areas, methods to address liability for contamination and responsibility for cleanup, appropriate methods and technologies for cleanup, funding sources for cleanup and remediation, methods to manage PFAS waste, appropriate testing for PFAS, and methods to eliminate workforce exposure. The bills direct the task force to issue an annual report to the Governor and legislature, beginning October 2023. (O'Hara)

Preemption of Over-the-counter Drugs and Cosmetics (Support)

HB 6019 (Eskamani) repeals current law provisions preempting the regulation of over-the-counter proprietary drugs and cosmetics to the state. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6019 (Eskamani) repeals current law provisions preempting the regulation of over-the-counter proprietary drugs and cosmetics to the state. (O'Hara)

Preemption of Recyclable and Polystyrene Materials (Support)

SB 320 (Stewart) and HB 6063 (Grieco) remove the current statutory preemption of local laws regarding the regulation of auxiliary containers, wrappings or disposable plastic bags. In addition, the bills remove the statutory preemption of local laws regarding the use or sale of polystyrene products to the Department of Agriculture. (O'Hara) ...

SB 320 (Stewart) and HB 6063 (Grieco) remove the current statutory preemption of local laws regarding the regulation of auxiliary containers, wrappings or disposable plastic bags. In addition, the bills remove the statutory preemption of local laws regarding the use or sale of polystyrene products to the Department of Agriculture. (O'Hara)

Preemption of Tree Pruning, Trimming and Removal (Support)

HB 6025 (Eskamani) and SB 316 (Stewart) repeal current law preempting specified local government regulations relating to tree pruning, trimming and removal on residential property. (O'Hara) ...

HB 6025 (Eskamani) and SB 316 (Stewart) repeal current law preempting specified local government regulations relating to tree pruning, trimming and removal on residential property. (O'Hara)

Public Bathing Places/Safe Waterways (Watch)

HB 393 (Hinson) and SB 604 (Berman) require the Department of Health to adopt and enforce certain rules and issue health advisories for public bathing places if the results of bacteriological water sampling at the site fail to meet health standards. The bills require the Department to notify a municipality or county if a health advisory is issued against swimming in public bathing places and require the county or municipality to place signage around public bathing places warning of the bacterial contamination until such time the bacterial contamination is resolved. (O'Hara) ...

HB 393 (Hinson) and SB 604 (Berman) require the Department of Health to adopt and enforce certain rules and issue health advisories for public bathing places if the results of bacteriological water sampling at the site fail to meet health standards. The bills require the Department to notify a municipality or county if a health advisory is issued against swimming in public bathing places and require the county or municipality to place signage around public bathing places warning of the bacterial contamination until such time the bacterial contamination is resolved. (O'Hara)

Public Financing of Potentially At-Risk Structures and Infrastructure (Watch)

SB 1434 (Rodriguez) and HB 1077 (Hunschofsky) revise current law provisions that require certain public-financed projects and infrastructure to undergo a Sea-Level Impact Projection Study prior to construction. The bills expand the types of projects and infrastructure subject to the requirement by including "potentially at-risk" projects within an area that is "at risk due to sea-level rise," as defined in the bills. The bills also add a requirement that a public-financed constructor provide a list of flood mitigation strategies evaluated as part of the design of the potentially at-risk structure or infrastructure and identify the flood mitigation strategies ...

SB 1434 (Rodriguez) and HB 1077 (Hunschofsky) revise current law provisions that require certain public-financed projects and infrastructure to undergo a Sea-Level Impact Projection Study prior to construction. The bills expand the types of projects and infrastructure subject to the requirement by including "potentially at-risk" projects within an area that is "at risk due to sea-level rise," as defined in the bills. The bills also add a requirement that a public-financed constructor provide a list of flood mitigation strategies evaluated as part of the design of the potentially at-risk structure or infrastructure and identify the flood mitigation strategies that have been implemented or are being considered as part of the structure or infrastructure design. (O'Hara)

Regulation of Single-use Plastic Products (Support)

HB 1145 (Mooney) and SB 1580 (Rodriguez, A.) authorize certain coastal communities as defined in the bills to establish pilot programs to regulate single-use plastic products. The bills also require the Department of Environmental Protection to submit updated retail plastic bag reports with conclusions and recommendations to the Legislature by specified dates. (O'Hara) ...

HB 1145 (Mooney) and SB 1580 (Rodriguez, A.) authorize certain coastal communities as defined in the bills to establish pilot programs to regulate single-use plastic products. The bills also require the Department of Environmental Protection to submit updated retail plastic bag reports with conclusions and recommendations to the Legislature by specified dates. (O'Hara)

Renewable Energy (Oppose)

SB 182 (Brandes) allows the owner of a business or a contracted third party to install, maintain and operate a renewable energy source device on or about the structure in which the business operates or on any property the business leases. The bill provides that the business owner or the third party may sell the electricity that is generated from the device to another business immediately adjacent to or within the same parcel as the business, and such sales shall not be considered or regulated as retail sales of electricity. The bill provides that if the energy-producing business ...

SB 182 (Brandes) allows the owner of a business or a contracted third party to install, maintain and operate a renewable energy source device on or about the structure in which the business operates or on any property the business leases. The bill provides that the business owner or the third party may sell the electricity that is generated from the device to another business immediately adjacent to or within the same parcel as the business, and such sales shall not be considered or regulated as retail sales of electricity. The bill provides that if the energy-producing business or its customers require additional related services from a utility, such as backup generation capacity or transmission services, the utility may recover the full cost of providing those services. The bill authorizes a utility to enter a contract with a business to install, maintain or operate any type of renewable energy source device on or about the structure from which the business operates and to sell the electricity to an adjacent business and the bill provides that such electricity sales shall not be considered or regulated as retail sales of electricity. The bill specifies that if the Public Service Commission determines the level of reduction in electricity purchases by customers using renewable energy source devices is significant enough to adversely impact the rates that other customers pay in the rate territory, the Commission may approve a utility's requests to recover its costs of providing the electricity needed by all customers, including customers using a renewable energy source device. The bill provides for methodology of such cost recovery, a process for customers to challenge the cost recovery and authorized rulemaking by the Commission. The bill may have a negative fiscal impact on municipal revenues, including potential impacts to municipal electric franchise revenues and municipal public service utility taxes. (O'Hara)

Residential Home Protection (Support)

SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and clarify the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. (O'Hara) ...

SB 518 (Brodeur) and HB 1555 (McClain) amend current law provisions that prohibit local governments from requiring permits for the removal of "dangerous" trees on residential property. The bills clarify what constitutes residential property and clarify the level of assessment and type of documentation that must be provided by an arborist or landscape architect under the law. (O'Hara)

Resiliency Energy Environment Florida Program (Watch)

HB 101 (Fine) and CS/SB 228 (Rodriguez) amend current law relating to Property Assessed Clean Energy programs, whereby local governments, alone or in partnership with a program administrator, may finance qualifying improvements on residential property relating to energy conservation and efficiency or renewable energy. The program is renamed the "Resiliency Energy Environment Florida Program." The bills expand the program to include nonresidential real property, including government leased property. The bills impose various requirements on a program administrator to reasonably determine a property owner has the ability to pay the estimated annual assessment. The bills impose obligations on a ...

HB 101 (Fine) and CS/SB 228 (Rodriguez) amend current law relating to Property Assessed Clean Energy programs, whereby local governments, alone or in partnership with a program administrator, may finance qualifying improvements on residential property relating to energy conservation and efficiency or renewable energy. The program is renamed the "Resiliency Energy Environment Florida Program." The bills expand the program to include nonresidential real property, including government leased property. The bills impose various requirements on a program administrator to reasonably determine a property owner has the ability to pay the estimated annual assessment. The bills impose obligations on a program administrator before it may enter a contract for a residential property, such as providing a financing estimate and specified disclosures to the owner. The bills require additional obligations on administrators relating to contractors, such as confirming the contractor has performed the applicable work or service before disbursing funds to the contractor. The bills also impose specified marketing and communications guidelines on PACE administrators and contractors and impose additional monitoring and reporting requirements on administrators. (Hughes)

Saltwater Intrusion Vulnerability Assessments (Watch)

SB 1238 (Polsky) and HB 1019 (Duggan) require coastal counties to conduct vulnerability assessments that analyze the effects of saltwater intrusion on their water supplies. The assessments must be conducted by September 2022. The bills require each coastal county to provide copies of its assessment to the Department of Environmental Protection and the respective water management districts. The bills require water management districts, in collaboration with coastal counties, to submit annually to DEP a list of proposed projects based on the assessments. (O'Hara) ...

SB 1238 (Polsky) and HB 1019 (Duggan) require coastal counties to conduct vulnerability assessments that analyze the effects of saltwater intrusion on their water supplies. The assessments must be conducted by September 2022. The bills require each coastal county to provide copies of its assessment to the Department of Environmental Protection and the respective water management districts. The bills require water management districts, in collaboration with coastal counties, to submit annually to DEP a list of proposed projects based on the assessments. (O'Hara)

Sanitary Sewer Lateral Inspection Programs (Watch)

HB 303 (Truenow) and SB 608 (Brodeur) authorize counties and municipalities to access sanitary sewer laterals within their jurisdiction to investigate, repair or replace the lateral. A sanitary sewer lateral is a privately-owned pipeline connecting a property to the main sewer line. The bills require municipalities and counties to notify private property owners within a specified timeframe if the government intends to access the owner's sanitary sewer lateral and an anticipated timeframe for the work. The bills specify that local governments who establish sanitary sewer lateral programs are legally and financially responsible for all work that is performed ...

HB 303 (Truenow) and SB 608 (Brodeur) authorize counties and municipalities to access sanitary sewer laterals within their jurisdiction to investigate, repair or replace the lateral. A sanitary sewer lateral is a privately-owned pipeline connecting a property to the main sewer line. The bills require municipalities and counties to notify private property owners within a specified timeframe if the government intends to access the owner's sanitary sewer lateral and an anticipated timeframe for the work. The bills specify that local governments who establish sanitary sewer lateral programs are legally and financially responsible for all work that is performed and authorize such programs to use specified state or local funds to evaluate and rehabilitate impaired laterals. (O'Hara)

Seagrass Mitigation Banks (Watch)

SB 198 (Rodriguez) authorizes the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund to establish seagrass mitigation banks under certain conditions. (O'Hara) ...

SB 198 (Rodriguez) authorizes the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund to establish seagrass mitigation banks under certain conditions. (O'Hara)

Soil and Groundwater Contamination (Support)

SB 1418 (Albritton) and HB 1475 (McClure) require the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt rules for statewide cleanup target levels for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in soil and groundwater. Such rules may not take effect until ratified by the legislature. Until the rules for a particular PFAS constituent have been ratified by the legislature, a person may not be subject to enforcement action by any state or local government entity to compel or enjoin site rehabilitation for that PFAS constituent. In addition, SB 1418 requires the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability to conduct ...

SB 1418 (Albritton) and HB 1475 (McClure) require the Department of Environmental Protection to adopt rules for statewide cleanup target levels for perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in soil and groundwater. Such rules may not take effect until ratified by the legislature. Until the rules for a particular PFAS constituent have been ratified by the legislature, a person may not be subject to enforcement action by any state or local government entity to compel or enjoin site rehabilitation for that PFAS constituent. In addition, SB 1418 requires the Office of Program Policy Analysis and Government Accountability to conduct an analysis of assessment and cleanup programs used in other states and submit a report to the Governor and Legislature by a specified date. (O'Hara)

Solar Photovoltaic Facility Development (Support)

HB 745 (Alexander) and SB 1562 (Ausley) direct the Department of Environmental Protection, in coordination with the Office of Energy within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, to conduct a study of brownfield sites and closed landfill sites to determine viable locations for redevelopment as solar photovoltaic facilities. The bills specify requirements for the study and directs DEP to submit a report to the Governor and Legislature by August 2023. (O'Hara) ...

HB 745 (Alexander) and SB 1562 (Ausley) direct the Department of Environmental Protection, in coordination with the Office of Energy within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, to conduct a study of brownfield sites and closed landfill sites to determine viable locations for redevelopment as solar photovoltaic facilities. The bills specify requirements for the study and directs DEP to submit a report to the Governor and Legislature by August 2023. (O'Hara)

State Renewable Energy Goals (Watch)

HB 81 (Eskamani) and SB 366 (Berman) prohibit the drilling, exploration or production of petroleum products in the state. In addition, the bills direct the Office of Energy within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to develop a statewide plan to generate 100% of the electricity used in the state from renewable energy by 2040 and for the state to have net-zero carbon emissions statewide by 2050. (O'Hara) ...

HB 81 (Eskamani) and SB 366 (Berman) prohibit the drilling, exploration or production of petroleum products in the state. In addition, the bills direct the Office of Energy within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to develop a statewide plan to generate 100% of the electricity used in the state from renewable energy by 2040 and for the state to have net-zero carbon emissions statewide by 2050. (O'Hara)

Statewide Flooding and Sea Level Rise Resilience (Support)

SB 1940 (Brodeur) establishes the Office of Resiliency within the Executive Office of the Governor and provides for the appointment of a Chief Resilience Officer. (O'Hara) ...

SB 1940 (Brodeur) establishes the Office of Resiliency within the Executive Office of the Governor and provides for the appointment of a Chief Resilience Officer. (O'Hara)

Study to Establish a Statewide Long-term Recycling Goal (Watch)

SB 1156 (Stewart) and HB 935 (Morales) require the Department of Environmental Protection to conduct a study on the establishment of a new long-term, statewide recycling goal. The bills specify the requirements for the study and require DEP to submit a report and any policy recommendations to the Governor and Legislature upon completion of the study. (O'Hara)  ...

SB 1156 (Stewart) and HB 935 (Morales) require the Department of Environmental Protection to conduct a study on the establishment of a new long-term, statewide recycling goal. The bills specify the requirements for the study and require DEP to submit a report and any policy recommendations to the Governor and Legislature upon completion of the study. (O'Hara)

Temporary Underground Power Panels (Watch)

HB 481 (Duggan) and SB 1332 (Wright) prohibit counties and municipalities from enacting regulations that prevent electric utilities from installing temporary underground power panels that meet the requirements of the National Electrical Code, and prevent counties and municipalities from requiring permanent inspections if the local government has already performed a temporary inspection. (O'Hara) ...

HB 481 (Duggan) and SB 1332 (Wright) prohibit counties and municipalities from enacting regulations that prevent electric utilities from installing temporary underground power panels that meet the requirements of the National Electrical Code, and prevent counties and municipalities from requiring permanent inspections if the local government has already performed a temporary inspection. (O'Hara)

Vessels/Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Watch)

HB 323 (Sirois) and CS/SB 494 (Hutson) revise the vessel conditions that an officer of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Commission) or law enforcement agency may use to determine that a vessel is at risk of becoming derelict to include vessels that are tied to an unlawful or unpermitted mooring or other structure. The bills prohibit local governments from designating public bathing beach areas or swim areas within the marked channel portion of the Florida Intracoastal Waterway or within 100 feet of the marked channel. The bills repeal Section 376.15, Florida Statutes, relating to derelict vessels ...

HB 323 (Sirois) and CS/SB 494 (Hutson) revise the vessel conditions that an officer of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (Commission) or law enforcement agency may use to determine that a vessel is at risk of becoming derelict to include vessels that are tied to an unlawful or unpermitted mooring or other structure. The bills prohibit local governments from designating public bathing beach areas or swim areas within the marked channel portion of the Florida Intracoastal Waterway or within 100 feet of the marked channel. The bills repeal Section 376.15, Florida Statutes, relating to derelict vessels and the relocation and removal of such vessels. The bills amend the definition of "abandoned property" to include vessels declared to be a public nuisance and clarify the notice requirements and procedure for vessels declared to be public nuisances. The bills authorize the Commission to establish a grant program for local governments regarding derelict vessels and vessels declared a public nuisance. (Branch)

Water Quality Enhancement Areas/Environmental Management (Watch)

SB 1426 (Burgess) and HB 965 (Truenow) provide for the construction, operation, maintenance and long-term management of offsite, regional, compensatory water treatment areas called "water quality enhancement areas." These areas will be used to offset impacts to water quality caused by increases in nutrient loading from development projects. Under the bills, water quality enhancement credits could be purchased from a water quality enhancement area to offset such development impacts. An "enhancement credit" is defined in the bills as a standard unit of measure which represents a quantity of pollutant removed. The bills specify that water quality enhancement areas ...

SB 1426 (Burgess) and HB 965 (Truenow) provide for the construction, operation, maintenance and long-term management of offsite, regional, compensatory water treatment areas called "water quality enhancement areas." These areas will be used to offset impacts to water quality caused by increases in nutrient loading from development projects. Under the bills, water quality enhancement credits could be purchased from a water quality enhancement area to offset such development impacts. An "enhancement credit" is defined in the bills as a standard unit of measure which represents a quantity of pollutant removed. The bills specify that water quality enhancement areas must be regulated through permits issued by the Department of Environmental Protection. While the bills allow governmental entities to use water quality enhancement areas to address their water quality needs, the bills specify that governmental entities may not act as sponsors to construct, operate, manage, maintain or market enhancement credits to third parties. In addition, the bills provide that local governments may not require a permit or impose regulations governing the operation of an enhancement area. A water quality enhancement area permit applicant must provide reasonable assurances that an enhancement area will achieve defined performance criteria, benefit water quality and assure long-term pollutant reduction. The bills specify requirements for an enhancement area and require that such areas correspond to the appropriate basin management action plan boundary. The bills specify requirements for the generation of enhancement credits and provide that a local government may not deny the use of credits due to the location of the enhancement area being outside the jurisdiction of the local government. (O'Hara)

Water Resources Management (Watch)

HB 349 (Sirois) authorizes the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund (Board) to grant easements for mitigation banks under certain conditions. The bill also exempts certain docks on recorded easements from state permit requirements and authorizes such docks to use submerged lands upon the Board's approval. (O'Hara) ...

HB 349 (Sirois) authorizes the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund (Board) to grant easements for mitigation banks under certain conditions. The bill also exempts certain docks on recorded easements from state permit requirements and authorizes such docks to use submerged lands upon the Board's approval. (O'Hara)

Well Stimulation (Watch)

SB 208 (Farmer) creates the Stop Fracking Act. The bill prohibits extreme well stimulation, which is defined to include the various forms of fracking used to increase the production at an oil or gas well. (O'Hara) ...

SB 208 (Farmer) creates the Stop Fracking Act. The bill prohibits extreme well stimulation, which is defined to include the various forms of fracking used to increase the production at an oil or gas well. (O'Hara)

Other Bills of Interest

HB 35 (Roach)  and SB 244 (Gruters) – Partisan Elections for Members of District School Boards ...

HB 35 (Roach)  and SB 244 (Gruters) – Partisan Elections for Members of District School Boards SB 442 (Rodriguez) and HB 571 (Mooney) – Powers of Land Authorities HB 309 (Fetterhoff) and SB 856 (Brodeur) – Private Provider Inspections of Onsite Sewage Treatment  and Disposal Systems SB 536 (Diaz) and HB 337 (McClain) – Administrative Procedures SB 690 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 691 (Slosberg) – Resilience-related Advisory Committees HB 421 (Truenow) and SB 834 (Brodeur) – Long-term Cleanup of Water Bodies SB 602 (Rodriguez, A.) and HB 449 (Mooney) – Land Acquisition Trust Fund (Florida Keys) HB 603 (Bell) and SB 1400 (Burgess) – Land Acquisition Trust Fund (Heartland Headwaters) HB 441 (Fabricio) and SB 984 (Diaz) – Construction Materials Mining Activities HB 6071 (Fabricio) – Construction Materials Mining Activities Admin Recovery Act HB 6073 (Fabricio) – Construction Materials Mining Activities Admin Recovery Act HB 579 (Melo) and SB 1128 (Harrell) – Aquatic Plant Management SB 840 (Albritton) and HB 841 (DiCeglie) – Residential Property Riparian Rights HB 513 (Bartleman) and SB 1326 (Rodriguez) – Comprehensive Review Study of the Central and Southern Florida Project SB 1000 (Albritton) and HB 1291 (McClure) – Nutrient Application Rates HB 6085 (Eskamani) and SB 1102 (Farmer) – Farming Operations HB 711 (Diamond) and SB 238 (Jones) – Endangered and Threatened Species SB 1110 (Rouson) and HB 1177 (Chaney) – Grease Waste Removal and Disposal HB 901 (Chambliss) and SB 1212 (Polsky) – Roadside Farm Stand Signage HB 7003 (Public Integrity  and Elections Committee) – Implementation of Constitutional Prohibition Against Lobbying by a Former Justice of Judge SB 1432 (Rodriguez) and HB 1065 (Mooney) – Vessel Anchoring SB 1352 (Brodeur) and HB 921 (Drake) – Limitations on Political Contributions SB 416 (Garcia) and HB 1129 (Avila) – Mangrove Planting  and Restoration SB 1914 (Taddeo) and HB 1353 (Thompson) – Elections SB 1722 (Jones) and HB 6105 (Hinson) – Elections SB 1586 (Polsky) and HB 1217 (Diamond) – Elections  HB 1381 (Silvers) – Retail Petroleum Fuel Measuring Devices SB 1612 (Ausley) and HB 1289 (Alexander) – Department of Agriculture  and Consumer Services SB 1678 (Gibson) and HB 1285 (Hinson) – Energy Equity Task Force SB 1584 (Gruters) – Outstanding Florida Springs

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